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Is HTRYC by Silman all that good?

stwils

I was thinking of buying HTRYC 4th Ed because it is for the kindle. I have not read the Amateurs Mind because it is not done for the kindle. MY rating fluctuates between 1365-1600 but I am ready to do some serious and enjoyable reading. The rest of the time will be spent all on tactics and on reading Purdy.

I know Dan Heisman says to wait until you have read the AM but it is not for the kindle. And I hate to wait any longer to read Silman. What do you think of my going ahead and getting Silman's book to read on my kindle?

squareofthepawn

I would go ahead and get it. It won't be over your head.

ffolkes

Check it out on scribd to see if it's for you.

shell_knight

The general idea, i.e. imbalances, wont be over your head.

But it probably wont improve your game much.  I had an earlier edition when I was 1300 OTB... which is like twenty-seven thousand chess.com online rating (lol, ok, whatever) and most of it was over my head.

Heh, but anyway, I agree with Heisman.  But get it if you want, the ideas will plant useful seeds that will blossom as you get better.

JRTK73

I think what shell_knight says is right. You can read an advanced book and understand all of it, it is just that those advanced concepts will rarely pop up in your own games. HTRYC is meant to be a very good book but there are other very good books on the same topic.

Robert_New_Alekhine
stwils wrote:

I was thinking of buying HTRYC 4th Ed because it is for the kindle. I have not read the Amateurs Mind because it is not done for the kindle. MY rating fluctuates between 1365-1600 but I am ready to do some serious and enjoyable reading. The rest of the time will be spent all on tactics and on reading Purdy.

I know Dan Heisman says to wait until you have read the AM but it is not for the kindle. And I hate to wait any longer to read Silman. What do you think of my going ahead and getting Silman's book to read on my kindle?

Yes, get it! even if you do not understand a thing right now, it is useful to have the book ready at hand when you already are at the level that is recommened to read it.

stwils

JRTK73 , What are some of them?

Kummatmebro

its the same exact stuff as my system.

linlaoda

love it

Kummatmebro
shell_knight wrote:

The general idea, i.e. imbalances, wont be over your head.

But it probably wont improve your game much.  I had an earlier edition when I was 1300 OTB... which is like twenty-seven thousand chess.com online rating (lol, ok, whatever) and most of it was over my head.

Heh, but anyway, I agree with Heisman.  But get it if you want, the ideas will plant useful seeds that will blossom as you get better.

the scope of heismans audience is people rated 800-1200.

his advice is useless if you know how to not hang pieces.

varelse1

I have found much of HTRYC helpful.

The biggest diference I have found between myself and Silman, is he sees the board in terms of inbalances, I see it on terms of counter-balances.

e.g. "I'll need to get a queenside attack going, to counter what my opponents doing pn the kingside." Or, "I'll have to make sure I preserve my bishop pair, to counter my opponents superior pawn structure."

I have always visualized chess like Monopoly. I trade lots. And try to get the better end of every trade.

Runner-Five
JRTK73 wrote:

I think what shell_knight says is right. You can read an advanced book and understand all of it, it is just that those advanced concepts will rarely pop up in your own games. HTRYC is meant to be a very good book but there are other very good books on the same topic.

What would you advise a weak but aspiring to improve player to use instead? Thank you!

pfren
Runner-Five wrote:
JRTK73 wrote:

I think what shell_knight says is right. You can read an advanced book and understand all of it, it is just that those advanced concepts will rarely pop up in your own games. HTRYC is meant to be a very good book but there are other very good books on the same topic.

What would you advise a weak but aspiring to improve player to use instead? Thank you!

 

Difficult to suggest something better than this one:

http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/docs/14/artur_yusupovs_awardwinning_training_course/

It is not a very popular course, for a very good reason: it does require from the student to work quite a bit to absorb the lessons, and 99% of the new players prefer being spoonfooded.

Runner-Five

Is the course basically the library of books on the home page? Or is there a place where people sign up for coaching? 

RussBell

HTRYC is going to be over the head of the average beginner-novice player.  It's analogous to someone wishing to learn mathematics choosing a book on calculus as their first math book.  If you are really intent upon choosing a book by Jeremy Silman as a first chess book, a better choice would be "The Amateur's Mind". 

Otherwise check out....

Good Chess Books for Beginners and Beyond...

https://www.chess.com/blog/RussBell/good-chess-books-for-beginners-and-beyond

pfren
Runner-Five wrote:

Is the course basically the library of books on the home page? Or is there a place where people sign up for coaching? 

 

The first two books of the "orange" series are available as MoveTrainer courses in Chessable. The others- not yet.

Itsameea

Old thread I see. The problems with Silman's book is that he offers no alternative to his lines if you do not respond exactly as expected. Bust it or use an engine to do so and you are on your own. I know it would be to much to go every one move by move that is not what I am saying. I am saying he left out how to approach that and a technique to evaluate and change your strategy with the shifting dynamics that can and do appear in a chess game.

Nwap111

Based on yi

Nwap111

Based on your rating, I suggest the Purdy book, all the ones he wrote, are a better choice. All the advice in his books are clear and excellent. His thinking method, which he outlines in several of his books, is on the mark. I agree with his assertion that until one sees every check, every capture, and every threat that he is not playing chess. I asked a friend of mine how he made it to master. His reply was simple and shocking:"I just stopped hanging pieces and pawns." Purdy would agree.