Russian School of Positional Chess

MartynRich
As there are too many books to choose from I’m wondering whether this would be a good read? I’m an average player and know the basics with some good tactics, but I’m starting to play in a league from January so I would like to move a nice way forward. Maybe rather than buy this I should just get a good, comprehensive book on one good opening?
IMBacon

G30 = 827

Correspondacne = 1041

Tactics rating = 887

You dont follow opening principles.  
You are hanging pieces.
You are missing simple tactics.
 
Stick to the basics.  
MartynRich

Thank you. A very informed answer.

IMBacon
MartynRich wrote:

Thank you. A very informed answer.

You have to be honest with yourself about your skill level, or youre going to study things youre not ready for.  That is when the frustration, and aggrrivation sets in, and the study ceases to be fun.

MartynRich
I appreciate that but I was referring to making an assessment of my ability through my stats. I was just asking for feedback on the book.
kindaspongey

Are you sre that you have the title right? In the meantime, these books were mostly not around in my early chess-playing days, but they are somewhat similar to the sort off thing that I found most helpful at the time:
Simple Attacking Plans by Fred Wilson (2012)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090402/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review874.pdf
http://dev.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Simple-Attacking-Plans-77p3731.htm
Logical Chess: Move by Move by Irving Chernev (1957)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708104437/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/logichess.pdf
The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played by Irving Chernev (1965)
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/most-instructive-games-of-chess-ever-played/
Winning Chess by Irving Chernev and Fred Reinfeld (1949)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708093415/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review919.pdf
Back to Basics: Tactics by Dan Heisman (2007)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708233537/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review585.pdf
https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-back-to-basics-tactics
Discovering Chess Openings by GM John Emms (2006)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627114655/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen91.pdf
Openings for Amateurs by Pete Tamburro (2014)
http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2014/05/review-of-pete-tamburros-openings-for.html
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/openings-for-amateurs/
https://www.mongoosepress.com/catalog/excerpts/openings_amateurs.pdf
Chess Endgames for Kids by Karsten Müller (2015)
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/chess-endgames-for-kids/
http://www.gambitbooks.com/pdfs/Chess_Endgames_for_Kids.pdf
A Guide to Chess Improvement by Dan Heisman (2010)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708105628/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review781.pdf

Studying Chess Made Easy by Andrew Soltis
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090448/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review750.pdf

Seirawan stuff:
http://seagaard.dk/review/eng/bo_beginner/ev_winning_chess.asp?KATID=BO&ID=BO-Beginner
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708092617/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review560.pdf
https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-winning-chess-endings
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627132508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen173.pdf
http://www.nystar.com/tamarkin/review1.htm

MartynRich

Thanks for the links. I have been checking out a lot of books. The link to the book I mentioned is here:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Manual-Positional-Chess-Middlegame/dp/9056916823

 

Selwink

The Complete Manual of Positional Chess is aimed at players rated 2000-2200. I wouldn't buy it yet if I were you

kindaspongey

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9040.pdf

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9049.pdf

There are two books in that series, I don't know about MartynRich, but the online samples make me feel like I am not ready for that stuff yet.

"The book is aimed at players who are already around first category strength [Translator's note: Approximately 2000-2200 Elo] but some examples will also be useful to players of a higher standard."

I love it when Sakaev recommends "Dvoretsky's oeuvre."

MartynRich
Ok thanks, I can leave it for another decade. I still need to pick a good book though
kindaspongey

Have you considered the sort of stuff mentioned in post #6 (~6 hours ago)?

IMBacon
MartynRich wrote:
I appreciate that but I was referring to making an assessment of my ability through my stats. I was just asking for feedback on the book.

The book youre asking about is way above your level.  As i posted before:

G30 = 827

Correspondacne = 1041

Tactics rating = 887

You dont follow opening principles.  
You are hanging pieces.
You are missing simple tactics.
 
As the old saying goes...Youre trying to put the cart before the horse.  A book on how to play positionally isnt going to help you whne you are still committing the basic mistakes.  You will get frustrated, chess, and learning will no longer be fun.
  
Follow Opening Principles:
Control the center.
Develop towards the center.
Castle.

Tactics...tactics...tactics...

Double check your moves.
 
After your opponent moves, ask yourself: "What is my opponnet trying to do?"

Lay off the speed/bullet chess.

Try books like Bruce Pandolfinis:
Beginning Chess
Endgame Course
Ultimate Guide to Chess
MartynRich
Thank you!
IMBacon
MartynRich wrote:
Thank you!

Whatever you decide, good luck to you!

ipcress12

Don't ignore exercise books like Susan Polgar's "Chess Tactics for Champions" which provides good practice on basic positions so it's rewarding.

It's important to choose books that challenge you without overwhelming you. There are a ton of books out there beyond my current reach.

You can also carry exercise books around and work on them while waiting in line or riding public transit.

ipcress12

When I was a young player, I was always hot on the scent for the next big authoritative chess book that was going to change my life. I remember how excited I was by the two-volume set "The Middle Game" by Euwe & Kramer.

I saved my pennies for the purchase, but as near as I could tell they were just two more chess books with lots of games and lots of analysis that was over my head. I was around a 1400 player at the time.

Since then I'm more careful to "punch my weight" with chess books. I guess GM Jacob Aagaard has good stuff to say but not to me. I stick to books where I can follow the arguments, maintain interest, and imagine using the material in my own games.

A few years ago I ran into an old Bent Larsen interview where he denounced the Euwe & Kramer books as terrible. I'm in no position to judge but it did cheer me up.