Beginner level training needed

chirag1207
Hi I want to star beginner level training.any one can help. Thanks
notmtwain
chirag1207 wrote:
Hi I want to star beginner level training.any one can help. Thanks

https://www.chess.com/learn-how-to-play-chess

chirag1207

Thanks very much for quick reply. I understand most basic training. I want to learn opening and controlling centre.

notmtwain
chirag1207 wrote:

Thanks very much for quick reply. I understand most basic training. I want to learn opening and controlling centre.

Try the lessons. Written by Grandmasters and International Masters. They cover every topic in chess.

RussBell

Good Chess Books for Beginners and Beyond....

https://www.chess.com/blog/RussBell/good-chess-books-for-beginners-and-beyond

kindaspongey

https://www.chess.com/article/view/study-plan-directory

"... In order to maximize the benefits of [theory and practice], these two should be approached in a balanced manner. ... Play as many slow games (60 5 or preferably slower) as possible, ... The other side of improvement is theory. ... This can be reading books, taking lessons, watching videos, doing problems on software, etc. ..." - NM Dan Heisman (2002)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627084053/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman19.pdf

"... If it’s instruction, you look for an author that addresses players at your level (buying something that’s too advanced won’t help you at all). This means that a classic book that is revered by many people might not be useful for you. ..." - IM Jeremy Silman (2015)

https://www.chess.com/article/view/the-best-chess-books-ever

Here are some reading possibilities that I often mention:

Simple Attacking Plans by Fred Wilson (2012)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090402/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review874.pdf

http://dev.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Simple-Attacking-Plans-77p3731.htm

Logical Chess: Move by Move by Irving Chernev (1957)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708104437/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/logichess.pdf

The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played by Irving Chernev (1965)

https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/most-instructive-games-of-chess-ever-played/

Winning Chess by Irving Chernev and Fred Reinfeld (1948)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708093415/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review919.pdf

Back to Basics: Tactics by Dan Heisman (2007)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708233537/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review585.pdf

https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-back-to-basics-tactics

Discovering Chess Openings by GM John Emms (2006)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627114655/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen91.pdf

Openings for Amateurs by Pete Tamburro (2014)

http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2014/05/review-of-pete-tamburros-openings-for.html

https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/openings-for-amateurs/

https://www.mongoosepress.com/catalog/excerpts/openings_amateurs.pdf

Chess Endgames for Kids by Karsten Müller (2015)

https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/chess-endgames-for-kids/

http://www.gambitbooks.com/pdfs/Chess_Endgames_for_Kids.pdf

A Guide to Chess Improvement by Dan Heisman (2010)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708105628/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review781.pdf

Studying Chess Made Easy by Andrew Soltis (2009)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090448/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review750.pdf

Seirawan stuff:

http://seagaard.dk/review/eng/bo_beginner/ev_winning_chess.asp?KATID=BO&ID=BO-Beginner

http://www.nystar.com/tamarkin/review1.htm

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627132508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen173.pdf

https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-winning-chess-endings

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708092617/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review560.pdf

samsernite12

 id be happy to review some games with you if you'd like

UAArtur

I can be your coach.

chirag1207

RussBell wrote:
thanks very much I feels interesting

BoboTheFlyingSheep67

Ok. Post some of your games and I'll see if I can help 🙂

BoboTheFlyingSheep67

Sorry my chess board option isn't working. I will write it out manually. I will post more later. 

Here is an part-analysis of your second most recent game: (I will continue the analysis later, because I do not have enough time to finish it today)

1. e4 e5 2. f4 (This temporary sacrifice is known as the King's gambit, in which White weakens up his King's defenders and sacrifices a pawn for superior development. White hopes to play 3. Nf3 followed by 4. d4 followed by 5. Bxf4, regaining his pawn. After White has good central control and developed pieces, White then wants to castle Kingside and place his Rook on the half open f-file) 2...Nc6 (Although this move developed a piece, it is best to accept the gambit and try to keep the pawn by playing 2...exf4 followed by 3...g4 (Muzio Gambit) and maybe launch a Kingside attack once your pieces are developed.) 3. Nf3 (Good, White developed a piece and fights for the center) 3...d6 (A slight inaccuracy. Black should play 3...d5 for better central control. If White captured your e-pawn, which doesn't seem adequately defended, you could, in turn capture his e-pawn with tempo, because it attacks the Knight. This move would have given you at least a small advantage.) 4. Bc4 (4. fxe4 would have been preferred)

BoboTheFlyingSheep67

4...h6 (This move doesn't accomplish anything. Taking the f-pawn would be preferred) 5. 0-0 (This move is a mistake because the Kingside isn't safe. You could take advantage of this by playing something like exf4 followed by G5 to gain an advantage and a Kingside attack) 5... Nf6 (Although this move developes a piece, taking the f pawn and following through with the aforementioned plan would be slightly better for Black)