Study Routine Advice

QuiteLife

Any tactic book is good.
Its just tactics.

If you need reviews, go to amazon and read what people wrote there.
Also sometimes there are some pages of it available to read.
Well, read them tongue.png

meowbrah
he said id be better off getting a tactic book that was arranged by theme, so i was asking him for recommendations based on that.
brother7
meowbrah wrote:
he said id be better off getting a tactic book that was arranged by theme, so i was asking him for recommendations based on that.

Beginning/Intermediate Tactics books based on theme

I own the Bain and Polgar books.

At your current chess strength (800), I suggest starting with either Bain or MacEnulty. The MacEnulty book is more recent (2015) vs Bain (1994) so I'd probably choose MacEnulty.

After MacEnulty, the Polgar book will cover a lot of the same ground using a fresh set of positions.

Finally, step up to the Weteschnik book. I don't know much about Weteschnik's book but it was recommended on the Perpetual Chess Podcast (an excellent podcast!). A quick search on Google unearthed this review by Gollum. I placed this book last because it is the more scholarly book, ie reads like a textbook.

After working through these books, you'll be ready to move to general exercise books which skip the prose and jump straight into positions, either categorized by theme or mixed together. Winning Chess Tactics for Juniors by Lou Hays is an excellent exercise book organized by theme.

The level above simple tactical themes is the combination. Combination Challenge by Lou Hays is the expanded version of Winning Chess Tactics for Juniors but is hard to find. Test Your Chess IQ by August Livshitz is a set of three books consisting of a series of timed tests. Livshitz's books are challenging!

 

kcorourke

Hi Meowbrah,

I see a lot of pretty good advice on here, but I would start even smaller. Don't try to practice everything. Try to practice specific things. I would suggest finding an open you enjoy and then watching a youtube video about that opening. You won't remember all of the lines, but while you watch the video, you will learn the idea behind it. I believe understanding the theory of positions is the most important thing. Before you do this though, I would recommend playing a lot of games and remembering the below;

- Develop your pieces

- Knights before bishops

- Minor pieces before major

- Don't rush your queen out

- Only move each piece once until they are all developed (unless it is attacked and it is hanging, or you believe an exchange is best)

- Castle early and often

These are not set in stone and there will be times where you will venture astray, but they are good things to remember and I guarantee you will improve simply by following those rules.  

 

Once you have those steps down pretty well, go on youtube and watch commentations of famous chess matches. You can also watch live streams. Simply watching really good players will start allowing you to see patterns and learn from what they do. A lot of people read books, but nothing has helped me more than simply watching people play.

 

Good luck - KC

QuiteLife
kcorourke wrote:

 

- Castle early and often


Two or three times per match

jambyvedar

meowbrah wrote:

thanks!

do you have any other recommendations aside from the the champion polgar puzzle book?

i recommend chess tactics for champion by susan polgar. spend at least 30 minutes everyday with that book and your ability to spot tactics, that wins material or mate combination, will improve. what i like about the book is that it has diverse tactical themes. not only it contains pin,fork,skewer ,decoy etc ,it also contains defensive puzzles, queening a pawn puzzles, mate puzzles and famous combinations.

kcorourke
QuiteLife wrote:
kcorourke wrote:

 

- Castle early and often


Two or three times per match

 

Lmao - You know what I meant.