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best opening that fulfils this checklist?

  • #1
    I like to start with 1.e4
    I like to also move a pawn to d4
    I like my bishops on either side of the pawns, and the knights on the square between the c and f pawns and the bishops
    I like my queen in the little gap made in front of it
    I like to castle queenside
    I like my king to have an escape route

    Not all Of these are necessary, but the first one is. I want to try a new opening that suits my style of play :)
  • #2

    *You don't have a style of play

    *Your opponent decides if you can do most of these things

    As a 900 rated player, you should add *I like to hang a free piece* because that's what will happen if you focus on the openings as much as you are at your level. 

    I'd focus on practicing tactics and seeing hanging material, and take it. Like in checkers.

  • #3
    Only 3 months ago I was 500 rated :(
  • #4

    Sounds like the Italian Game or Giuoco Piano, but you won't be able to place both your bishops at B4 in that or any opening unless your opponent errs, as far as I know.

    It sounds even more like a Sicilian Defense, especially the Dragon Sicilian, but you can't force Black to play any variation of the Sicilian.

  • #5
    brumtown wrote:
    I like to start with 1.e4
    I like to also move a pawn to d4
    I like my bishops on either side of the pawns, and the knights on the square between the c and f pawns and the bishops
    I like my queen in the little gap made in front of it
    I like to castle queenside
    I like my king to have an escape route

    Not all Of these are necessary, but the first one is. I want to try a new opening that suits my style of play :)

    The basics of each phase of the game

     

    Opening:

    Follow the Opening principles:

    1. Control the center squares – d4-e4-d5-e5

    2. Develop your minor pieces toward the center – piece activity is the key

    • Complete your development before moving a piece twice or starting an attack.

    • Move pieces not pawns.

    1. Castle

    2. Connect your rooks

    • By move 12, you should have connected your Rooks, or be about to do so.

     

    Middle game:

    When you have completed the Opening Principles, you are now at the middle game. Now you need to formulate a middle game plan. The middle game is a very complicated part of a chess game. A simple way to develop a middle game plan is to perform the following steps.

    1. Scan your opponents 5th, and 6th ranks (3rd, and 4th if your black)

    2. Look for weak pawns, and or weak squares.

    • Weak pawns and squares are Pawns, and squares that cannot be defended by another Pawn.

    • Knights are excellent pieces on weak squares.

    • When deciding on weak squares, and weak Pawns to attack, the closer to the center the better

     

    End game:

    Start with the basics:

    1. Learn basic mates – KQ vs. K, KR vs. K, KRR vs. K

    2. Learn Opposition, and Key Squares

    3. Learn basic King and Pawn endings

     

    Pre Move Checklist:

     

    1. Make sure all your pieces are safe.

    2. Look for forcing move: Checks, captures, threats. You want to look at ALL forcing moves (even the bad ones) this will force you look at, and see the entire board.

    3. If there are no forcing moves, you then want to remove any of your opponent’s pieces from your side of the board.

    1. If your opponent doesn’t have any of his pieces on your side of the board, then you want to improve the position of your least active piece.

     

     

  • #6

    Youre a beginner.  You dont have a style of play, unless not following opening principles, hanging pieces, and missing simple tactics is a syle.  Youre also not an agressive player, and youre not tactical.

  • #7
    Play me 3 days per move ;)
  • #8

    Challenge me to unrated 3 day/move game if you wish. 

  • #9
    brumtown wrote:
    Play me 3 days per move ;)

    Sent...

  • #10
  • #11

    your opponent may not let you realize your plan.  remember this.

  • #12

    and in case you forget.

  • #13

    Yup, at our level, saying we have a style of play is like your postman saying he has a style of solving problems in quantum physics after skimming "A Briefer History of Time" by Hawking & Mlodinow. 

  • #14
    intermediatedinoz wrote:

    It's about patterns you know. Kareem Abdul Jabbar does not fit well in a tank.

    but yogi coudoux does

  • #15

    For someone seeking help with choosing openings, I usually bring up Openings for Amateurs by Pete Tamburro (2014).
    http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2014/05/review-of-pete-tamburros-openings-for.html
    https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/openings-for-amateurs/
    I believe that it is possible to see a fair portion of the beginning of Tamburro's book by going to the Mongoose Press site.
    https://www.mongoosepress.com/excerpts/OpeningsForAmateurs%20sample.pdf
    Perhaps brumtown would also want to look at Discovering Chess Openings by GM John Emms (2006).
    https://web.archive.org/web/20140627114655/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen91.pdf
    "Each player should choose an opening that attracts him. Some players are looking for a gambit as White, others for Black gambits. Many players that are starting out (or have bad memories) want to avoid mainstream systems, others want dynamic openings, and others want calm positional pathways. It’s all about personal taste and personal need.
    For example, if you feel you’re poor at tactics you can choose a quiet positional opening (trying to hide from your weakness and just play chess), or seek more dynamic openings that engender lots of tactics and sacrifices (this might lead to more losses but, over time, will improve your tactical skills and make you stronger)." - IM Jeremy Silman (January 28, 2016)

    "Building a repertoire ... we will take the idealized situation of someone starting from square one ... The first step is to think about your personal style. Do you prefer open, tactical positions or closed, strategic positions? Does an attack on your king make you nervous, or are you happy so long as you have a counter-attack? Do you prefer main lines, or something slightly offbeat? Next, look at the various openings available, and see which ones fit in with your personal style. ..." - GM John Nunn (1998)
    https://www.chess.com/article/view/picking-the-correct-opening-repertoire
    http://chess-teacher.com/best-chess-openings/
    https://www.chess.com/blog/TigerLilov/build-your-opening-repertoire
    https://www.chess.com/blog/CraiggoryC/how-to-build-an-opening-repertoire
    https://www.chess.com/article/view/learning-an-opening-to-memorize-or-understand
    https://www.chess.com/article/view/the-perfect-opening-for-the-lazy-student
    https://www.chess.com/article/view/3-ways-to-learn-new-openings
    https://www.chess.com/article/view/how-to-understand-openings
    https://www.newinchess.com/Shop/Images/Pdfs/9035.pdf
    https://web.archive.org/web/20140627110453/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen169.pdf
    https://www.newinchess.com/Shop/Images/Pdfs/9029.pdf
    https://www.newinchess.com/Shop/Images/Pdfs/7277.pdf
    https://www.newinchess.com/Shop/Images/Pdfs/9033.pdf

    https://web.archive.org/web/20140627104938/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen159.pdf

    https://web.archive.org/web/20140627022042/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen153.pdf

    https://web.archive.org/web/20140627132508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen173.pdf

  • #16

    Play 5 | 5 Blitz. Go for "Scholars mate". You'll be teaching the total beginners a nice lesson, and get a few points. It will also give you practice on not hanging your Queen. Do a computer analysis every time, and jot down one tip from the computer - it can beat Kasparov so you know you can trust it! Play new tips every other game or so, or when you get bored of going for scholars mate.

  • #17

    The OP is in a gap year for becoming a physics student. "Play principled moves" might be good advice for a kid, could get a bit boring for an adult with scientific ability. Try different moves see what happens, do computer analysis to tell you supposedly better moves. Derive some principles from these experiments, see if they hold up to the lists of principles provided in this thread. You might find that these lists of principles don't hold up pretty quickly. For example, the Napoleon opening is a perfectly valid "book opening" but doesn't stick to "develop minor pieces first."

    With a little digging you can find it played by IMs to shake up GMs. Unusual openings, that you know and your opponent is unlikely to, might stretch your opponents to breaking point. (My results leaped in Blitz using Kings gambit...)

    "During brief preparation to the next round I suddenly found out that after 1.e4 e5 my opponent, an International master from Bulgaria, liked 2.Qf3. Well, I thought; the intention is rather clear – 3.Bc4 and mate next move! Maybe a little impudent, but still curious plan. Even if Black doesn't blunder the mate, White gets pretty decent play; for example, his queen can go to g3, in order to support f2-f4 after Ne2, and so on."

    https://www.chess.com/blog/VB84/napoleon-opening

  • #18
    Thx mal :)
  • #19

    "...Napoleon opening is a perfectly valid "book opening" but doesn't stick to "develop minor pieces first.  With a little digging you can find it played by IMs to shake up GMs."

     

    The problem with this advice is that the OP is not an IM, and he isnt trying to shake up GM's.  True, there are worse 2nd moves to make, but it still doesnt follow opening principles.  And at the OP's level, principles is what he needs, not shock value. 

  • #20

    Your list of "principles" is also very vague and hand wavy. What do you mean by control? How do you develop your minor pieces toward the center? What do you mean by activity? And so on... If you must give advice why not refer the OP to a decent book explaining these principles properly. If there is one.

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