Chebanenko slav??

gwnn

I just got Victor Bologan's comprehensive book on the Chebanenko slav. I'm thinking of playing it as black but as a d4 player I can also find a line against it that suits me. Just for kicks, I skimmed through the variations and looks like (according to the author) none of white's tries give him an advantage if all black replies! Do you think he's biased and if so (or even if he's objective), which is the best line against it, i.e. makes life hardest for Black to prove equality?

MrBlunderful

The thing that ruined practically all of the d5 defenses for me was the uptick in the popularity of the Catalan-style lines.  And this one is no exception.

Avoiding the Catalan was one of the big draws that originally led me to Slavdom to begin with, but when you can't develop the bishop outside the pawn chain, you're back in the same uphill trudge you face against all the other Catalan-ish lines.

In the a6 Slav, you can't really afford to sneak Bf5 in before e6 if white has Catalan on his mind.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 a6 5.a4 (denying the ...b5 resource) Bf5 6.Qb3 Ra7, and white follows up soon with a5, c5 and a real positional lockdown on the queenside, when black's resources are too tied up over there to counterattack with much success.  Makes for a long day at the office.

So instead, black is more or less forced into 5...e6, when white follows up with 6.g3 and the groaning commences from the black side of the board.

Now, if you actually ENJOY defending these types of positions, then this isn't so much of an imposition.  But if you actually did, presumably you'd be playing the QGD or something instead.

 

(And just to add: the delayed exchange is no picnic, either.)

MrBlunderful
ajedrecito wrote:

Why do you think the system you just described leads to a White advantage? It looks to me like White deprives himself of active play and places the bishop on a locked diagonal.


 I suppose for all the same reasons that closed systems with an early c6 haven't refuted the Catalan (and are, in fact, poor scorers against it).

Either black is going to open things quickly and voluntarily with dxc, in which case your g2 bishop now has plenty of scope, or black is going to keep things closed, in which case the fianchetto bishop becomes a key player in supporting the e4 break.

I don't think theory is having all that much success deciding how or when black is equalizing in a lot of Catalan lines.  What high-level games are proving, however, is that white is having a pretty good time of it OTB.  And even though this either transposes into a true Catalan only later in the game...or not at all (a hybrid, I guess you'd call it)...the middle games tend to play out pretty similarly, and the top-level players are giving it the full weight of their support.

All of which is simply to say: it's a tough line for black to play.

Estragon

I tend to agree with MrBlunderful as to White's best idea, at least it would most suit my temperment to play the lines with g3, partly on the theory that White can react to the move ...a6 either by playing against it directly with c4-c5, or by playing so as to make it less relevant.  Black often does play ...a6 in ...c6 lines against the Catalan, too, but it is usually because he needs to and not because he wants to.

A player with a different outlook could surely choose the c5 approach, and I would have no reason to criticize his choice.  In any opening there are commonly many points for each side to choose between more or less equally good moves based upon personal taste.  This is such a case.

Yet the Chebanenko remains a very tough nut to crack in the hands of a patient opportunist.  Even where White achieves some advantage it can be difficult to bring it to realization.

gwnn

Also, does anyone here play the Chebanenko with Black? Some people seem to feel terribly cramped and have to fight for a draw, others seem to feel it's very dynamic and fun. Where is the truth? :)

MrBlunderful
ajedrecito wrote:

5.a4 e6 6.g3 c5 is interesting, as the inclusion of a4 and a6 in this Tarrasch-type position seems to favor Black, while wasting a tempo on ...c6 and ...c5 may compensate. White can probably get an advantage with 7.cxd5 exd5 8.Bg2 Nc6 9.Bg5 though Black scores quite well from these lines.


 Haven't seen this line.

Looks like mainly it ends up 7...cxd with symmetry and a dead draw.  But I doubt many clubbers play 4...a6 in the hopes of drawing.

The exd does seem to offer some play, even though I haven't found any games with 9.Bg5.  Looks like maybe it heads to IQP-ville if both sides want to continue to fight for the win.  Baburin, FTW!

Interesting idea.  Thanks.

MrBlunderful
gwnn wrote:

Some people seem to feel terribly cramped and have to fight for a draw, others seem to feel it's very dynamic and fun. Where is the truth? :)


 Can I vote, "all of the above?"

gwnn
MrBlunderful wrote:
gwnn wrote:

Some people seem to feel terribly cramped and have to fight for a draw, others seem to feel it's very dynamic and fun. Where is the truth? :)


 Can I vote, "all of the above?"


Definitely, but it would be nice if you could explain what you mean by it. I could think of more than one interpretation.

gwnn

:) cool game. Bologan gives this line only as a sideline and refers to this game (~2700 opps):

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1281971

won by white in 20 moves.

looks like something I'd like to try! thanks

gwnn

I see Black blundered in a slightly worse position though. I still like it better as white than most other lines I think. Good tip.

TwoMove

It's the same, or just a6 slav. Chebanenko was a russian trainer who found a lot of the key ideas of opening.

kindaspongey
gwnn wrote:

... the Chebanenko slav ... which is the best line against it, i.e. makes life hardest for Black to prove equality?

Possibly helpful:

A Strategic Chess Opening Repertoire for White by IM John Watson (2012),

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627105428/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen161.pdf

www.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Strategic-Chess-Opening-Repertoire-for-White-A-76p3721.htm

http://www.gambitbooks.com/pdfs/A_Strategic_Chess_Opening_Repertoire_for_White.pdf

Playing 1.d4: The Queen's Gambit by Lars Schandorff (2012),

https://web.archive.org/web/20140626221508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen162.pdf

www.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Playing-1-d4-The-Queens-Gambit-76p3736.htm

http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/ebooks/Playing1d4QueensGambitexcerpt.pdf

The Kaufman Repertoire for Black & White by GM Larry Kaufman (2012)https://web.archive.org/web/20140626221508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen162.pdf

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/955.pdf

A practical repertoire with 1.d4 and 2.c4 Volume 1 by Alexei Kornev,

http://reviews.dailychess.org/a-practical-repertoire-with-1-d4-and-2-c4-the-complete-queens-gambit-volume-1-by-alexei-kornev-chess-stars-2013-304-pages/

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7288.pdf

If the Catalan is your interest, perhaps:

Grandmaster Repertoire 1B - The Queen's Gambit by Boris Avrukh.

http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/ebooks/1BTheQueensGambit-excerpt.pdf