dealing with the slav

  • #1

    hey all. I am an expert level player looking for a good way to meet the slav defense for white. I've been playing (1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4. e3) for the last few years with some good results but i don't really think it fits my style of play very good since i am more of a dynamic player rather than a positonal player but i will play positionally if needed. Thanks!

  • #2

    Try the 3 Nc3 lines.  Whether Black plays ...dxc4 or ...e5, it will usually end up a more open game than the usual Slav stuff, more chances to mix it up.

     

    Of course, in the main lines 4 Bg5 can lead to very active and tactical play, too.

  • #3

    @uhohspaghettio and Estragon

    i recentley borrowed a book from a close by chess club, the book was the slav: move by move by cyrus lakdawala and its published in 2011 so the slav theory was relatively fresh. i looked at all the chapters with 3. Nc3 especially the geller gambit and it looked like black was equalizing and doing very well in those lines. Is there any slav book for white published in the last couple years or is there any super GM's games i could look at to get some ideas? Thanks again!

  • #4

    Yea just go to the 2010 World Chess Championships there is a few games that get into some slav lines

    Game(s): 3 - Slav Defense: Weisbaden Variation D17, 5- Slav Defense D17 , 8 - Slav Defense: Czech. Wiesbaden Variation D17 

    2 ties and 1 victory

  • #5

    alright thanks a lot for the help uhohspaghettio and mr.duban! I'll try the 3.Nc3 lines and see how it goes Wink

  • #6

    Beyond raw statistics or the recommendations of people selling opening books, what is truly important in your choice of opening line is that you feel good playing it, are comfortable with the sort of positions you get from it, and are confident about your chances when the games steers into it.

    The objective differences between most mainstream opening variations, and even between those and many unusual lines, can only be consistently exploited by strong masters.  The difference in your play between a line you feel good about and one you are nervous about is far greater.

    Take your time in choosing your lines, play them all if you must to find those you really like playing.  When you settle on a line, play it faithfully, and you will become more familiar with it than your opponents likely will be.  That alone helps your results.

  • #7
    samarth22 wrote:

    @uhohspaghettio and Estragon

    i recentley borrowed a book from a close by chess club, the book was the slav: move by move by cyrus lakdawala and its published in 2011 so the slav theory was relatively fresh. i looked at all the chapters with 3. Nc3 especially the geller gambit and it looked like black was equalizing and doing very well in those lines. Is there any slav book for white published in the last couple years or is there any super GM's games i could look at to get some ideas? Thanks again!


     

    Cy is a strong player who labored for many years in weekend events and the few longer open tournaments to get his chances, and succeeded by merit and determination.

    That said, he is hardly a world class authority on the various approaches to the Slav, he is selling a book and analysis tends to fit the theme of opening books.  This is why you should never waste your money on opening books (other than encyclopedia-type classification works, and even those can't promise the latest on most variations).

    But if you choose to believe what is in the first book you read on a variation, experience may be your most effective teacher.  Good luck!

  • #8

    Well, Magnus plays the 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 system in a very dynamic way!

    Granted, his approach in the Bg6 variation is not considered either in Lakdawala's book, nor Avrukh's. I do think Lakdawala is a very good book author, and quite a strong player. I did not like any of Avrukh's books so far, as he frequently loses his thread in a maelstrom of variations and he almost always is stuck on certain positional taboos. Of course they are far from bad books, just not the style of books I enjoy reading.

    Another plus of this system is that if Black opts for a Semi-Slav White can get a slight plus while avoiding tons of theory by 5.b3!? (which is indeed recommended by Avrukh). And finally, it also deals effectively with Lautier's pet system (known as the Chebanenko Slav).

    I have played a lot of Slavs (with both colors) and recently I switched as White to the 4.e3 system, because I feel it's the only way to challenge Black positionally.

    I was also playing many years ago the Geller Gambit- apparently inspired by Watson's old booklet. I had a 4-0 perfect score, but this should be attributed to blunders by Black, not the opening itself. I don't think white can count on any advantage against a well-prepared Black, in any of the three main lines (8.ab5, 8.Ng5 and 8.Be2). On top level, white is scoring rather poorly, but at amateur level I expect white scoring quite well- provided that he forgets about what is objectively best.

  • #9
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