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Forcing agressive repertoire?

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LeonMNE

Hello there, currently i am playing London, French and QGD for OTB games. I feel like that does not put my opponent under any pressure whatsoever. I would rather have some repertoire that i can get most of the time (if not everytime) and that is a bit more dangerous than an exchange French (hehe).

Any suggestions? happy.png

weirdkidx

I would suggest e4 e5 for everything aggressive

Sadlone

Drop the French , play center counter Scandinavian vs e4 and Benoni vs queen pawn and against c4 and nf3 play kings Indian/Benoni type setups aiming for kingside attack , this completes your aggressive repertoire as black

tygxc

@1

"London, French and QGD" ++ Good

"I feel like that does not put my opponent under any pressure whatsoever" ++ Your feeling is wrong. Grandmasters play London, French and QGD, and their opponents are under pressure.

"I would rather have some repertoire that i can get most of the time (if not everytime) and that is a bit more dangerous than an exchange French (hehe)."
++ Exchange French is dangerous to white. Here is an example, reached by transposition
https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=2330933 

RenegadeQ

Play open games. You're not really going to find "aggressive" openings, not in the way you're thinking anyway. Aggressive play is simply creating the possibility for tactics in the position, open games lend themselves a bit more to that than closed games. The London is solid but doesn't objectively push for an advantage. Main lines are main lines for a reason

GraynSupreme
Open games is key

Sicilian always turns out crazy for me when I play against it so consider that
ThrillerFan
LeonMNE wrote:

Hello there, currently i am playing London, French and QGD for OTB games. I feel like that does not put my opponent under any pressure whatsoever. I would rather have some repertoire that i can get most of the time (if not everytime) and that is a bit more dangerous than an exchange French (hehe).

Any suggestions?

 

The London will scare nobody.  You need to play 2.c4 if you want to get any kind of attack as a d4-player.

 

Speaking as a French player myself, it and the Sicilian are the two most aggressive defenses to 1.e4.  The Winawer leads to wild positions.  The Tarrasch, with his knight impeding his queenside pieces, 3...c5 gives Black the initiative at the cost of a not so ideal pawn structure (IQP).

 

You whine about the exchange?  Do not try to force the issue.  Play the symmetrical game and you already have a free half point.  Grind out the endgame (usually minor piece, like N vs N or NN vs BN) for the other half of the point.

 

Since 2014, I have played the symmetrical setup against the Exchange, have about 50 such games over the board where I faced the exchange, and have LITERALLY one loss in a game I was winning but got in severe time trouble with the very quick time control.  Otherwise, it is all wins and draws.  Roughly 30 Wins and 20 draws against the Exchange.

 

Learn to be patient and the Exchange is a complete joke!  You will get your attacks in the Winawer and Tarrasch.

 

So in summary, trash the London System for 2.c4 instead.  Leave the rest of your repertoire alone!

1cbb

Play 1. b4