How to best study the King's Indian ?

ronnie76

Hi,

I like to get some advice/tips on studying the King's Indian.
The problem I face: there's are a lot of video's here on chess.com and the KI knows also a lot of variations so I'm a bit lost on where to start and wich route to take (what variations are most preferable to learn ?)

Any tips on it will be very well appriciated by me.

Greetings,

Ronald

poucin

Babaev's video series is fine.

Not too complicated (give basic ideas and no more but enough) and educational.

But don't expect a clear route playing King's indian : king's indian is very difficult to handle.

I don't say it to discourage u but this opening (that I play since my childhood), is a jungle : many variations, many structures, many adjustements, many manoeuvres...

I would never advice someone with your rating playing it but if u are motivated, give it a try!

ronnie76

Merci Poucin !
Tonight at my club I prepared the Budapest Gambit (and some variations on it) with the video's of Simon Williams, knowing that my opponent would open with 1. d4. I was suprised at move 3. e3 ..... promised myself to have a better answer for this.
I will check out the Babaev's video series, thx for that tip !

Bon nuit !

Yigor
poucin wrote:

But don't expect a clear route playing King's indian : king's indian is very difficult to handle.

 

Blessed are simple-minded in chess, a clear King's Indian road is clear to them blitz.png: Normal variation --> Standard development --> Orthodox variation. peshka.pngtongue.png

IMBacon
ronnie76 wrote:

Hi,

I like to get some advice/tips on studying the King's Indian.
The problem I face: there's are a lot of video's here on chess.com and the KI knows also a lot of variations so I'm a bit lost on where to start and wich route to take (what variations are most preferable to learn ?)

Any tips on it will be very well appriciated by me.

Greetings,

Ronald

Hate to burst your bubble, but openings are not your issue, and the last thing you should be spending time on.

pfren

Your blundering frequency in the games you are playing here, suggests studying basic tactics instead of openings... unless you blunder on purpose, that is.

Morphysrevenges
Play over all the King’s Indian Games from the Zurich International 1953. The notes in the tournament book by Bronstein are solid gold. It is one of the top rated chess books of all time. Very instructional.
ronnie76

Super, thanks all of you for your comments happy.png I can profit from that.

And pfren, of course I don't blunder on purpose and I also study the tactics, I try to study from all sides (tactics, openings, GM games and analysing my own games) but time is a scarcity as you might now.....

SkeweredFork

the best way to study it is to not study it

BonTheCat
Morphysrevenges wrote:
Play over all the King’s Indian Games from the Zurich International 1953. The notes in the tournament book by Bronstein are solid gold. It is one of the top rated chess books of all time. Very instructional.

Can only concur (Bronstein and Vainstain produced a marvellous piece of chess literature there). Bronstein was (together with Isaac Boleslavsky) one of the great pioneers of the King's Indian in 40s and 50s. He's also a written a book called 'Bronstein on the King's Indian'. It contains 114 games of his own (50 serious tournament games annotated in detail plus another 64 with brief or no notes at all from a variety of events, tournaments, simuls and off-hand games). Just as importantly, the first 1/4 of the book is devoted to standard themes, motifs and manouevres for both Black and White.

kindaspongey
BonTheCat wrote:
Morphysrevenges wrote:
Play over all the King’s Indian Games from the Zurich International 1953. ...

Can only concur (Bronstein and Vainstain produced ...

A sample can be seen at:

http://store.doverpublications.com/0486238008.html

DeirdreSkye
ronnie76 wrote:

Super, thanks all of you for your comments I can profit from that.

And pfren, of course I don't blunder on purpose and I also study the tactics, I try to study from all sides (tactics, openings, GM games and analysing my own games) but time is a scarcity as you might now.....

    With time a scarcity as you say , spending it to learn King's Indain is the best and the most certain way not to improve. Play something that is easier to learn and understand , focus more in tactics , middlegame and of course the fundamental endgames that everyone in your level neglects.

    Pick something easy and simple against 1.d4. Something that will give you a playable middlegame with only one hour of study.

For example , the relatively forgotten Orthodox fiancheto defense in Queen's gambit declined.

 

 

Here are some games:

 

ronnie76

Wow, thank you so much for the above post, really appreciate that !

kindaspongey

First Steps: The Queen's Gambit

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7652.pdf

The Queen's Gambit Declined: Move by Move

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7743.pdf

Starting Out: The King's Indian (2002)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627055734/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen38.pdf

King's Indian Defence Move by Move

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7736.pdf

BonTheCat

I can only concur with DeirdreSkye with regards to the Tartakower Variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined. It's well worth learning the classical openings first.

12Knaves

Several videos are available online. There are loads of instructive games by elite players. Ding Liren and Hikaru Nakamura have won some excellent games with the King's Indian Defence.

gregflat9
Book called Starting out with D4 is a good general intro
kindaspongey
gregflat9 wrote:
Book called Starting out with D4 is a good general intro

Not sure what book is being suggested here, but Starting Out: 1 d4 is a book with advice for White, and it is somewhat less helpful for Black.