Najdorf English Attack, when will the final verdict be reached?

TwoMove

The threat is trapping the queen, and forces the exchange of black's best peice bg7.

pfren
PPS2 wrote:

sorry if i am being annoying wht is the point of Qe3

Bb6, of course.

It does have the tactical drawback of 18.Qe3 Nc4, when the queen is attacked, and white has to take the knight immediately.

18.Qf2? does not have this drawback, but falls into Gelfand's nasty sacrifice 18...Rc6! 19.f4 Rfc8!



pfren
TwoMove wrote:

Have never had an opponent play 6...Ng4 against me, so frankly speaking know no theory in it. If opponent was higher, or even similar rated, depending on mood would allow 7Bc1 Nf6 draw. If weaker after 7Bg5 h6 8Bh4 g5 9Bg3 Bg7 10h3 Ne5 which are quite natural moves, f3 wouldn't be obvious to me. Had five/ten minute look at position considered 8be2 Nc6 9Nb3 then probably castle king-side. Play the classical line against the dragon, it's vaguely similar. White looks alright, wouldn't expect to have much. Against a much weaker opponent considered 8Qd2 Nc6 then castle queen-side. Then can optimistically try to exploit g5 as a weakness, especially if black castles. The options aren't the critical ones, but look solid enough, and when white can always choose something like this. The idea that as a club player need to know all the theory, seems rubbish to me.

Black's main problem if he is explicitly playing for a win is that in all those sharp lines, there are quite a few lines where a draw is almost inevitable. Recent example from a game of mine:

I think that in correspondence chess at least, I will forget about sharp, theoretical play- since any half-decent player with a good database and a working engine can pull a draw out of his hat. Quiet, positional, non-variation critical play has worked best for me so far.

chesskingdreamer

Rxb2 draw agreed lol. Now that is why correspondence chess is pretty awesome, because all of the games don't really make much sense. Of course, to a computer it is obvious, but to humans, well...

PPS2

But does white have any other moves than Qe3 cause Qe3 has a tactical trick and improves tha postion of the queen but is there really no other moves in the position

TwoMove

Need to deal with g4xf3, and Nc4 anyway so that reduces options a bit.

pfren
chesskingdreamer wrote:

Rxb2 draw agreed lol. Now that is why correspondence chess is pretty awesome, because all of the games don't really make much sense. Of course, to a computer it is obvious, but to humans, well...

Well... look at #34. There are quite a few things that are NOT obvious to engines, and this is a good example. During the game I was ready to replay the mistake a few other 2200+ correspondence players made (21...Rfc8?), and the engine said everything is fine- but my positional instict was objecting, there was smell of fish in the air!

Glaucon333

How has theory on the english attack and anti-english developed since 2015? What about the 6. f3 lines?

Glaucon333

Najdorf English Attack, when will the final verdict be reached?

Glaucon333

If the English attack is not so good anymore, how can white come out of the opening with an advantage in the sicilian najdorf? If he cannot, why doesn't everyone play d4, c4, or the Moscow variation of the sicilian instead?

pfren
Glaucon333 έγραψε:

If the English attack is not so good anymore, how can white come out of the opening with an advantage in the sicilian najdorf? If he cannot, why doesn't everyone play d4, c4, or the Moscow variation of the sicilian instead?

There is no white advantage with any first move. One simply picks lines which he is more familiar with.

chinmayavyas

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 Ng4 7. Bc1 Nf6 8. Be3 Ng4 9. Bc1 is best

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cool

 

 

 

 

 

 

it is a good opening

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glaucon333

I suppose that if there is no white advantage to any first move, GMs must simply not be so familiar with 1. b3, seeing as they do not play it nearly as often as 1. e4 or 1. d4? Or what about the alternative explanation, that 1. e4 provides a greater chance at advantage than 1. b3?

Bishop_g5
Glaucon333 wrote:

I suppose that if there is no white advantage to any first move, GMs must simply not be so familiar with 1. b3, seeing as they do not play it nearly as often as 1. e4 or 1. d4? Or what about the alternative explanation, that 1. e4 provides a greater chance at advantage than 1. b3?

 

 1) Show to us where is White's advantage in the English Attack vs Najdorf defense both in e5 and e6 approach by black ....because i haven't found any.

2) The opening advantage is something most of the times spatial. It can be translated as: " slight initiative " , " space advantage " , " more active pieces " , " potential passed pawn ", "better-attacking chances " ,  " control of the center ". e.t.c

Unfortunately or fortunately chess is more complex than all this and as the game continues beyond the opening stage you realize that is quite difficult to keep hold this " advantages " forever without allowing the second player the merit of his/her play that's why most of the players concluded that there is no advantage in any White's first move either white's decides to occupy the center from the beginning or delay...

That is the practical approach of the game played by humans. If you are interested only for Artificial Intelligence chess ask Leela. I don't think this thread can give you more answers.