Solid, aggressive openings?

DavidSloann

Hello, I am an intermediate chess player and am looking for a chess opening that is aggressive but solid (not like the Halloween gambit...something an aggressive gm would play). I have been playing the Ruy lopez, dragon, kings indian, and slav. I feel like these are all solid openings but not as aggressive as I want them to be... If you can think of any openings that suit my needs that would be great! Thanks!

 

Side note: I see the starting move nf3 a lot and it looks cool... 

Cali_boy613
The dragon Yugoslav variation is about as aggressive as it gets, and I think it’s the main line
Cali_boy613
If you don’t like that, the Sicilian sveshnikov fits your description, though it’s very sharp. Playing these openings at an intermediate will fail against advanced players due to the difficulty of the sveshnikov and dragon. But against similar level players you’d be fine. Also, the Dutch and bird are both solid and aggressive
Cali_boy613
Evans gambit maybe? Queens gambit?
jumpingchesshorse

Look up the Traxler counter attack (against the Italian game): it's not the MOST sound opening on Earth, but it is extremely aggressive and should work quite well in blitz and should be quite fun to play for a while

jumpingchesshorse

A more sound attack might be the Kings Indian Attack- I think Bobby Fischer played it a bunch, and it works against a bunch of systems (like the Sicilian)

thil003
Italian also good
Potato1470

london system

JordanNexhip

I think 1100 makes you more of a beginner level player still.

Anyway I think The Scotch Game or The King's Gambit may be what you're looking for

IMBacon
DavidSloann wrote:

Hello, I am an intermediate chess player and am looking for a chess opening that is aggressive but solid (not like the Halloween gambit...something an aggressive gm would play). I have been playing the Ruy lopez, dragon, kings indian, and slav. I feel like these are all solid openings but not as aggressive as I want them to be... If you can think of any openings that suit my needs that would be great! Thanks!

 

Side note: I see the starting move nf3 a lot and it looks cool... 

You dont follow opening pirnciples.

You hang pieces.

You miss simple tactics.

Studying more openings isnt going to solve the real problems in your game.

LawAndOrderKing

Solid and agressive? Can you elaborate?

kindaspongey

For someone seeking help with choosing openings, I usually bring up Openings for Amateurs by Pete Tamburro (2014).
http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2014/05/review-of-pete-tamburros-openings-for.html
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/openings-for-amateurs/
I believe that it is possible to see a fair portion of the beginning of Tamburro's book by going to the Mongoose Press site.
https://www.mongoosepress.com/catalog/excerpts/openings_amateurs.pdf
Perhaps DavidSloann would also want to look at Discovering Chess Openings by GM John Emms (2006).
"... For beginning players, [Discovering Chess Openings] will offer an opportunity to start out on the right foot and really get a feel for what is happening on the board. ..." - FM Carsten Hansen (2006)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627114655/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen91.pdf
"There is no such thing as a 'best opening.' Each player should choose an opening that attracts him. Some players are looking for a gambit as White, others for Black gambits. Many players that are starting out (or have bad memories) want to avoid mainstream systems, others want dynamic openings, and others want calm positional pathways. It’s all about personal taste and personal need.
For example, if you feel you’re poor at tactics you can choose a quiet positional opening (trying to hide from your weakness and just play chess), or seek more dynamic openings that engender lots of tactics and sacrifices (this might lead to more losses but, over time, will improve your tactical skills and make you stronger)." - IM Jeremy Silman (January 28, 2016)
https://www.chess.com/article/view/opening-questions-and-a-dream-mate
https://www.chess.com/article/view/picking-the-correct-opening-repertoire
http://chess-teacher.com/best-chess-openings/
https://www.chess.com/blog/TigerLilov/build-your-opening-repertoire
https://www.chess.com/blog/CraiggoryC/how-to-build-an-opening-repertoire
https://www.chess.com/article/view/learning-an-opening-to-memorize-or-understand
https://www.chess.com/article/view/the-perfect-opening-for-the-lazy-student
https://www.chess.com/article/view/3-ways-to-learn-new-openings
https://www.chess.com/article/view/how-to-understand-openings
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9035.pdf
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627110453/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen169.pdf
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9029.pdf
https://www.chess.com/article/view/has-the-king-s-indian-attack-been-forgotten
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7277.pdf
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9033.pdf
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9050.pdf
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627104938/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen159.pdf
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627022042/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen153.pdf
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627132508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen173.pdf
"... Overall, I would advise most players to stick to a fairly limited range of openings, and not to worry about learning too much by heart. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)
"... Once you identify an opening you really like and wish to learn in more depth, then should you pick up a book on a particular opening or variation. Start with ones that explain the opening variations and are not just meant for advanced players. ..." - Dan Heisman (2001)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140626180930/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman06.pdf
"... To begin with, only study the main lines ... you can easily fill in the unusual lines later. ..." - GM John Nunn (2006)
"... I feel that the main reasons to buy an opening book are to give a good overview of the opening, and to explain general plans and ideas. ..." - GM John Nunn (2006)
"... If the book contains illustrative games, it is worth playing these over first ..." - GM John Nunn (2006)
"... the average player only needs to know a limited amount about the openings he plays. Providing he understands the main aims of the opening, a few typical plans and a handful of basic variations, that is enough. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)
"... For inexperienced players, I think the model that bases opening discussions on more or less complete games that are fully annotated, though with a main focus on the opening and early middlegame, is the ideal. ..." - FM Carsten Hansen (2010)
"... Everyman Chess has started a new series aimed at those who want to understand the basics of an opening, i.e., the not-yet-so-strong players. ... I imagine [there] will be a long series based on the premise of bringing the basic ideas of an opening to the reader through plenty of introductory text, game annotations, hints, plans and much more. ..." - FM Carsten Hansen (2002)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627055734/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen38.pdf
"The way I suggest you study this book is to play through the main games once, relatively quickly, and then start playing the variation in actual games. Playing an opening in real games is of vital importance - without this kind of live practice it is impossible to get a 'feel' for the kind of game it leads to. There is time enough later for involvement with the details, after playing your games it is good to look up the line." - GM Nigel Davies (2005)

LawAndOrderKing

@kindaspongey How do you find all these links? Do you own some of the books? Which are your favorite books.

kindaspongey

I just accumulate the links over time. Perhaps I should eliminate some. I own some of the books, but it has to be admitted that my reading is pretty sporadic. I think that I am mostly beyond the target audience of the Emms and Tamburro books, but they seem like the sort of books that I wish that I had been able to read decades ago. Now, I like books that are mostly collections of games on this or that opening.

adumbrate

 

DANISH_IRFAN

adumbrate wrote:

 

well played
fromrivertosea

Use the Italian opening man. I always play that when I am serious. While playing it you can be aggressive or opt to defend whenever deems fit to you. It's my favorite and I consider it as the best opening. You will not get bored when playing it.

Immortal101

At your level, try the Fried Liver Attack. Sounds awful but its a tricky play. Just google it.

chandulachandula

thil003 wrote:

Italian also good

thil003 wrote but