Forums

The Milner-Barry Gambit, and the trap

Sort:
Superbeer
adityasaxena4 schreef:

I used to play 1.e6 2.c5 but the problem was after 3.d5 then 4.Nbd2 is a Tarrasch French and if not I thought I was out of options until I found 3.a6 avoiding all French's and going into a Drazic Variation of the Sicilian a rare sideline almost never played 

Honestly, if you don't want to play any French lines it makes a lot more sense to choose another response than 1. ... e6. 

I can also tell you from experience that it's a lot more useful to actually study a certain defense and get to know all the nuances (and learn to play all kinds of positions) than to play one single sideline defense.
I used to play the Hyperaccelerated Dragon (1. e4 c5 2. N.f3 g6) to avoid studying too much theory, but since I actually took the time to study the French defense and all it's (sub)variations I've become a much better player as a whole. 

tygxc

#42
The Millner Barry Gambit is not bad, but it is not to be feared either.
Here is a recent example from Vachier-Lagrave:
https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=2097003

And here is a classical example from Tal:
https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1139522 

Kasey221
chesster3145 wrote:

I don't understand. Doesn't 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. O-O give Black a small edge?

no

adityasaxena4
Superbeer wrote:
adityasaxena4 schreef:

I used to play 1.e6 2.c5 but the problem was after 3.d5 then 4.Nbd2 is a Tarrasch French and if not I thought I was out of options until I found 3.a6 avoiding all French's and going into a Drazic Variation of the Sicilian a rare sideline almost never played

Honestly, if you don't want to play any French lines it makes a lot more sense to choose another response than 1. ... e6. 
I can also tell you from experience that it's a lot more useful to actually study a certain defense and get to know all the nuances (and learn to play all kinds of positions) than to play one single sideline defense.
I used to play the Hyperaccelerated Dragon (1. e4 c5 2. N.f3 g6) to avoid studying too much theory, but since I actually took the time to study the French defense and all it's (sub)variations I've become a much better player as a whole.

This is what I play nowadays :

This new idea that I came up with of fianchettoing the kingside knight to c7 and playing for the d5 or b5 pawn breaks . D5 in particular .

ThrillerFan
adityasaxena4 wrote:
Superbeer wrote:
adityasaxena4 schreef:

I used to play 1.e6 2.c5 but the problem was after 3.d5 then 4.Nbd2 is a Tarrasch French and if not I thought I was out of options until I found 3.a6 avoiding all French's and going into a Drazic Variation of the Sicilian a rare sideline almost never played

Honestly, if you don't want to play any French lines it makes a lot more sense to choose another response than 1. ... e6. 
I can also tell you from experience that it's a lot more useful to actually study a certain defense and get to know all the nuances (and learn to play all kinds of positions) than to play one single sideline defense.
I used to play the Hyperaccelerated Dragon (1. e4 c5 2. N.f3 g6) to avoid studying too much theory, but since I actually took the time to study the French defense and all it's (sub)variations I've become a much better player as a whole.

This is what I play nowadays :

This new idea that I came up with of fianchettoing the kingside knight to c7 and playing for the d5 or b5 pawn breaks . D5 in particular .

You would never get that against me or anybody else that knows what they are doing.

1.d4 e6 2.e4 c5?! 3.d5!, leading to the Schmid Benoni, which is an advantage for White well beyond the slight advantage he gets for going first.

3.Nf3 merely gives in to Black's desire to play a Sicilian and a sound defense.

adityasaxena4

Where's your Schmid Benoni @ThrillerFan ?

jakefromstatefarm38
Cool
Mazetoskylo
adityasaxena4 wrote:

Where's your Schmid Benoni @ThrillerFan ?

Well... in your lines Black is playing a bad version of the old Benoni (1.d4 c5 2.d5 e5) under even worse conditions: Black has wasted a tempo by playing ...e6 and then ...e5. Under such conditions, white of course won't be disappointed at all because Black has "avoided" the Schmidt Benoni.

For example, your 1.d4 e6 2.d4 c5?! 3.d5 d6 4.Nf3 e5? 5.Nfd2 (going for a4, Nc4, Nc3, Bd3 etc) Black is positionally lost, already.