Forums
Forums

What the heck is the purpose of a Knights' Tango opening?

Sort:
PierceTheVeilFan

I was in a game and I started with d4, then my opponent proceeded with the Knights' tango opening. It honestly just wasted all of their time because I was developing almost all of my pieces by sending out my pawns. I ended up having a 12 point advantage complete with their queen before they resigned.

russeljack
The person u played blunderd all their pieces. It has nothing to do with the two nights tango.the tango can be sound in the right hands at ur rating it is definitely not
russeljack
Also you cannot develop pieces by sending out pawns
PierceTheVeilFan
russeljack wrote:
Also you cannot develop pieces by sending out pawns

well it opened up the scope of most of my pieces so kinda developing.

russeljack
Fair enough
CaroKannEnjoyer02

Normally, the knights tango opening is very good for taking opponents out of theory, and if you know a couple things, it can be VERY powerful. However, if white knows how to play, it can also be very very risky for black.

BuzzleGuzzle

Found the game.

darkunorthodox88

blacks pieces are in great squares. the knights are ready to pounce in a kingside attack, the dark squared bishop is a monster and the light square bishop is usually saved for the endgame where the pawns on dark squares make it a harmonious piece.

CaroKannEnjoyer02
darkunorthodox88 wrote:

blacks pieces are in great squares. the knights are ready to pounce in a kingside attack, the dark squared bishop is a monster and the light square bishop is usually saved for the endgame where the pawns on dark squares make it a harmonious piece.

I am sorry, but could you tell me the purpose of a5?

maafernan

Hi!

The idea after 1. d4, Nf6, 2. c4, Nc6 !? is to play ...e5 challenging white center, for instance if 3. Nc3 then 3...e5. Or if White pushes 3. d5, then 3...Ne5 followed by ...e6 counterattacking the center in a hypermodern way. Black has to be comfortable with somewhat cramped positions that may arise and White should not overextend. My impression is that White has the better chances and the easier play. I would not recommend this defense for beginners.

If you would like to see my recommendations for beginners, then you might check out my post:

https://www.chess.com/blog/maafernan/openings-for-beginners

Good luck!

darkunorthodox88
CaroKannEnjoyer02 wrote:
darkunorthodox88 wrote:

blacks pieces are in great squares. the knights are ready to pounce in a kingside attack, the dark squared bishop is a monster and the light square bishop is usually saved for the endgame where the pawns on dark squares make it a harmonious piece.

I am sorry, but could you tell me the purpose of a5?

white knows the c5 bishop is powerful, so na4 is coming soon, a5 allows the bishop to retreat also a5 stops a3-b4

CaroKannEnjoyer02
darkunorthodox88 wrote:
CaroKannEnjoyer02 wrote:
darkunorthodox88 wrote:

blacks pieces are in great squares. the knights are ready to pounce in a kingside attack, the dark squared bishop is a monster and the light square bishop is usually saved for the endgame where the pawns on dark squares make it a harmonious piece.

I am sorry, but could you tell me the purpose of a5?

white knows the c5 bishop is powerful, so na4 is coming soon, a5 allows the bishop to retreat also a5 stops a3-b4

Thank you! I have seen that type of move in a lot of master games (especially in the guioco pianissimo)

AngryPuffer

hypermodern opening where you give white a center and you try to strike back at it