Why is this Alekhine's and not Scandinavian?

GambitShift

I just finished a game and chess.com at least is calling it an Alekhine's Scandinavian variation, but it started as a Scandinavian and then Alekhine, so why not Scandinavian Alekhine variation here?

baddogno

You can drive yourself a little crazy trying to figure out why and how openings are named.  That there is no consensus among the various databases doesn't help.  I just checked the Explorer here and it has a different name!

GambitShift

It looks like it depends on move order. In the game I played it settled on Alekhine, but if you want to strictly go by definition it would have been played this way.

 

 

poucin

Another proof engines are clueless or let's say not trustworthy to name openings.

The official name is scandinavian - modern variation, though nobody really calls it like that.

Same for 2...Qxd5, the Mieses-Kotroc variation but once again nobody calls it like this.

We just call scandinavian Nf6 and scandinavian Qxd5. for this Qxd5, more precise would be scandinavian Qd6/Qd8/Qa5 or other according black's answer on 3.Nc3.

Don't focus too much on names given by websites : sometimes it is ok, sometimes it is ridiculous...

But maybe u don't tell everything and if we play 1.e4 Cf6 2.Nc3 d5, then this terminology makes some sense...

ThrillerFan
GambitShift wrote:

It looks like it depends on move order. In the game I played it settled on Alekhine, but if you want to strictly go by definition it would have been played this way.

 

 

 

Opening names do not depend on move order and chess.com is the absolute worst at naming openings as many of them are outright WRONG!  Many names they give do not even exist!

 

The worst one is the "Sicilian Defense, French Variation".  There is NO SUCH THING.  1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 is simply the Sicilian Defense.  Now if 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6, you have the Taimanov.  4...a6 instead you have the Kan.  4...Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 you have the Four Knights Variation.  5...Bb4 you have the Pin variation.

3.c3 instead of 3.d4 and you have the Alapin (through a transposition).  

 

And as far as move order, does not matter.

1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.c4 Nf6 5 Nc3 is the Panov-Botvinnik Attack in the Caro-Kann

1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.d4 c6 4.c4 cxd5 5.Nc3 is the Panov-Botvinnik Attack in the Caro-Kann

 

Quit getting hung up in the names here because they are wrong, and understand the positions.  Whether the game goes 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.f4 c5 or 1.e4 c5 2.d4 d5 3.f3 e6 4.Nc3 Nf6 5.e5 Nfd7 6.f4 c5, you have to understand the French Steinitz (Caro-Kann players can avoid transposing to the French by playing 3...dxe4, 3...Qb6, 3...g6, or 4...Bb4).  Just like whether the game goes 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3 Nf6 or 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d3 (instead of 5.d4 or 5.Nc3) Nf6 6.d4 d5, you are in an Exchange French.  But, but, but I thought this was a Petroff?  Not any more!

 

So quit getting hung up in the names, and understand the possible transpositions in the openings you play!

blueemu

It can also be reached from the Dunst (1. Nc3) as well as from the Alekhine's or the Scandinavian... opening names depend only on the position reached, not on the move order used to reach it.

Curiously, I used to play that system as White back in the 1970s, and I won the Championship of the four maritime provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland) using that system as White back in 1973:

 

SNUDOO
blueemu wrote:

It can also be reached from the Dunst (1. Nc3) as well as from the Alekhine's or the Scandinavian... opening names depend only on the position reached, not on the move order used to reach it.

Curiously, I used to play that system as White back in the 1970s, and I won the Championship of the four maritime provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland) using that system as White back in 1973:

 

Personally I believe pushing e5 is stronger for white. What do you think?

 

blueemu
SNUDOO wrote:
blueemu wrote:

It can also be reached from the Dunst (1. Nc3) as well as from the Alekhine's or the Scandinavian... opening names depend only on the position reached, not on the move order used to reach it.

Curiously, I used to play that system as White back in the 1970s, and I won the Championship of the four maritime provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland) using that system as White back in 1973:

Personally I believe pushing e5 is stronger for white. What do you think?

3. ... Nfd7 has given better results in OTB play than 4. ... d4.

GambitShift

[The worst one is the "Sicilian Defense, French Variation"]

 

How about this one: 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 d5 4.exd5 Qxd5 

 

KGA Scandinavian?

ThrillerFan
GambitShift wrote:

[The worst one is the "Sicilian Defense, French Variation"]

 

How about this one: 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 d5 4.exd5 Qxd5 

 

KGA Scandinavian?

 

If that is what they call it here (I wouldn't know as I don't play the KG from either side any more), that is just more proof that chess.com is inept at naming openings!

Sep-Gol

in this i play 4.e6!? after Nfd7.

here g6 is a blunder

right is c5

and play moves on.
.

GambitShift

On chess.com they call it KGA modern variation. But in Arena 3.5.1 it shows this.