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Why is there so much talk about Bobby Fischer

IpswichMatt
just_someone123 wrote:

My granddad played him and found him quite an average player. He always thought there was some very strong player in the audience giving Fischer advice through complex but subtle visual signals like scratching  his ears, adjusting his tie, blinking, or looking at his watch

Who is your Granddad?

tygxc

#40
Hans Kmoch called it the game of the century then:
https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1008361 

tygxc

#39
If this were true, then how could Fischer win the double round robin 5|0 blitz tournament at Herceg Novi 1970 with 19/22 before Tal 14, Korchnoi 14, Petrosian 13, Bronstein 13 etc.?

IpswichMatt
tygxc wrote:

#39
If this were true, then how could Fischer win the double round robin 5|0 blitz tournament at Herceg Novi 1970 with 19/22 before Tal 14, Korchnoi 14, Petrosian 13, Bronstein 13 etc.?

Maybe just got lucky?

blueemu
IpswichMatt wrote:
tygxc wrote:

#39
If this were true, then how could Fischer win the double round robin 5|0 blitz tournament at Herceg Novi 1970 with 19/22 before Tal 14, Korchnoi 14, Petrosian 13, Bronstein 13 etc.?

Maybe just got lucky?

When Fischer started racking up his impressive streak of results in 1970-71, there were skeptics who claimed that his opponents were just "playing below their full strength" against him for some reason.

Fischer replied that people had been "playing below their full strength" against him since the 1950s.

tygxc

#44
Winning by such a big margin has nothing to do with luck.
Tal said all grandmasters hung pieces, but Fischer did not hang a single pawn. Fischer did not use more than 3 minutes. Here is one of his blitz games, annotated by himself.
https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1044673 

IpswichMatt
tygxc wrote:

#44
Winning by such a big margin has nothing to do with luck.
Tal said all grandmasters hung pieces, but Fischer did not hang a single pawn. Fischer did not use more than 3 minutes. Here is one of his blitz games, annotated by himself.
https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1044673 

Yes I was being ironic when I said maybe he got lucky!

mpaetz

     The reason that you hear so much about Bobby Fischer today was the massive amount of publicity generated by the 1972 world championship match vs Spassky. The Cold War Soviet vs American aspect was played to the hilt and the event was covered as front-page news around the world, talked about on major-network nightly news shows, even covered live on broadcast TV (PBS). The unprecedentedly-large prize fund put up by organizers eager to cash in on the interest helped the hype. Then Fischer's many demands and threats to withdraw kept it in the news for months. People in the US were particularly excited, and membership in the US Chess Federation and participation in chess tournaments temporarily tripled. A lot of the older people on this site (which is American and has a great % of American members) became interested in chess during this "Fischer boom", so they frequently reference him in their posts.

     Of course Fischer was among the all-time top players and his dominance at his peak was impressive. Others have been as overwhelming in their time (Morphy in the 1850s, Capablanca 1914-1924, Botvinnik in the 1940s, Kasparov in the late 1980s early 1990s) but the Fischer mystique was fueled when he retired young (technically 1975 but actually 1972), so his fans can fantasize that he would have been even more magnificent than he really was. 

BlackKaweah
His book “My 60 Memorable Games” is reason enough.
RichColorado