Two queens?

witherd1

How can pawns redeem more than one queen?  Is this a glitch in the game that allows this?

BlunderousWilliam

Could you further explain what you're talking about? Do you mean a pawn capturing two queens at one time, or a pawn promoting to two queens, or two pawns promoting to two queens? Sorry for my misunderstanding happy.png

witherd1

All good.  Sorry for not being clear.  I have an opponent that has taken two separate pawns to promote both of them to queens, giving him two queens on the board.  I haven't been playing online for too long, but I know this isn't possible in traditional play

 

OtW47

The maximum number of queen possible is 9 ...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Promotion_(chess)

 

Lagomorph
witherd1 wrote:

 I haven't been playing online for too long, but I know this isn't possible in traditional play

 

Perfectly legal under chess  rules.

HushedFalconSr

@Lagomorph yes

witherd1

Well, never got taught that.  On a traditional board, how is a 2nd, 3rd, etc queen depicted?

 

santa777x

2 queens are handy

 

HennieSchaper
witherd1 wrote:

Well, never got taught that.  On a traditional board, how is a 2nd, 3rd, etc queen depicted?

Pawn on rook or rook upside down was common when I played OTB.

 

crick2

yes 2 queens are definitely handy

santa777x

The more queens you have the easier chance of winning

cerebov
witherd1 wrote:

 but I know this isn't possible in traditional play

Wow.

BlunderousWilliam
santa777x wrote:

The more queens you have the easier chance of winning

That's often true, but the more queens you have, the more you also have to watch out for stalemate. It's really easy to let happen when you take away so many squares from your opponent happy.png

DerekDHarvey

In actual matches and tournaments extra Queens are provided on every board.

DerekDHarvey

Here is an example of 4 Queen madness:

Chess: Melvin960 vs DerekDHarvey - 5560951510 - Chess.com

DerekDHarvey

The fun starts on move 40 when both sides have active Queens and with both Kings unsafe.

DerekDHarvey

The confusion goes back 500 years when players in Europe had to agree which rules they would use, either Spanish or Italian. One allowed 2 Queens the other stipulated that it had to be a captured piece that the pawn promoted to. However, with the onset of printing the laws of chess were agreed to this day.

rpmcampton

A rook turned upside down rook makes a handy dandy extra queen

DerekDHarvey

Not officially for a few years now. That is why an extra Queen is provided at matches, tournaments and whenever you buy a new set. Online we never see an upside down Rook.

Lagomorph
witherd1 wrote:

Well, never got taught that.  On a traditional board, how is a 2nd, 3rd, etc queen depicted?

 

Most top end Staunton sets have two queens.......