Early Endgame Trouble - any resources, tips or training advise

TheOnoZone

I am having trouble with what I would call the 'early endgame', if that is an expression. I find I can get myself up material in almost all of my games and then I fall apart when the queens are off the board and only a few minor pieces and pawns remain. I have been making good progress playing rapid 30 minutes daily, but today I had the worlds most embarrassing draw, and it was only a draw because my opponent blundered stalemate. I was two minor pieces up, (a bit low on time) and I just fell apart. This is happening a lot to me.

Does anyone have any helpful resources for this part of the game? I have been studying 100 Endgames You Need to Know on chessable, however this is a little later in the endgame than where my trouble starts, and honestly I am finding it quite tough and just focusing on the endings recommended by the author for low rated players.

Aside from this study I am also doing tactics daily for 30 minutes using the woodpecker method (although with easier puzzles than in the woodpecker book - just using the method).

If anyone can point my to some useful resources or some training methods would be great, thanks in advance happy.png.

Ono

nklristic

Perhaps these tips will be of use:

https://www.chess.com/blog/nklristic/how-to-approach-the-endgame-first-steps-to-chess-improvement

In any case, in short, try to kill any counterplay  and have you pieces as active as they can be. Take your time, any mistake in the endgame can be fatal, even more so than in middlegame. Check out some rook and pawn positions - Lucena and Philidor, those are the most basic but you would be surprised how many people doesn't know those. King and pawn endgames are super important as well. Why because if you know these things you will know when it is favorable for you to simplify. 

As for blunders, no quick cure I am afraid, you just have to concentrate as best as you can and take your time, we all make mistakes from time to time.

llama47

There's some old quote about "the way to win a won game is by eliminating the opponent's counterplay"

So if you're up material, just make sure your king is safe, and your pieces are active. By active I generally mean:

1) They're free to move to many squares
2) They're on a protected square and/or can't be chased away easily
3) They're near the enemy king or weak pawns

If you have a safe king and pieces like that, then it's usually pretty easy to force exchanges and win the resulting endgame.

A common mistake for newer players is they'll move their most active pieces a lot, but notice to do what I'm recommending means you'll be looking for your least active pieces, and trying to improve them.

---

Other than that I feel like it's hard to give advice without seeing an example game.

TheOnoZone
nklristic wrote:

Perhaps these tips will be of use:

https://www.chess.com/blog/nklristic/how-to-approach-the-endgame-first-steps-to-chess-improvement

In any case, in short, try to kill any counterplay  and have you pieces as active as they can be. Take your time, any mistake in the endgame can be fatal, even more so than in middlegame. Check out some rook and pawn positions - Lucena and Philidor, those are the most basic but you would be surprised how many people doesn't know those. King and pawn endgames are super important as well. Why because if you know these things you will know when it is favorable for you to simplify. 

As for blunders, no quick cure I am afraid, you just have to concentrate as best as you can and take your time, we all make mistakes from time to time.


Thanks I will take a look, your articles are always great, but I haven't looked at that one. Using de la Villa's book I have been focusing on king and pawn and rook endgames, learning them slowly but that isn't the main issue. Hoping to gain some insight from your article!

nklristic

Well I looked at the game in question, you've both blundered left and right actually. I will analyze it and show you what I mean.