Endgame book suggestions for 1700 FIDE player

alesjakk

Hi!

I am a 15 year old chess player with a FIDE rating of around 1720. I have struggled with endgames, a week ago I had a rook endgame against a Fide Master in blitz where it was a theoretically drawn position, but I lost it. I want suggestions on what books I should get to have a solid endgame knowledge both on endgame theory and practical play that is good enough for maybe 2000 strength FIDE. What is your suggestions?

Thanks in advance!

alesjakk

What do you mean? I do not have my game against the fide master, it was just an example that I need to improve on my endgames, and I want to know which book or books I should study to get an endgame knowledge that are around 2000+ strength in FIDE.

alesjakk

It is one hundred percent wrong that Carlsen did not read any book before he achieved his number one spot in the world. I want some serious book suggestions that can fully cover what I need to gain 2000+ strength in the endgame.

alesjakk

I do not think you understand my question... I am asking for what books I should read to gain 2000+ strength in endgames. By the way what are your rating?

alesjakk

What is your rating?

alesjakk

WhatDidIMiss, thanks for getting a good answer!

alesjakk

MasterMindSouvlaki, no it is not a bad question because if your rating is like 1200 which is the only rating I can find on your chess.com profile then you do not have enough knowledge to answer my question, but I finally got a good answer from another guy, so I DONT CARE!

BonTheCat

alesjakk: I would also recommend reading Mikhail Shereshevsky's books, 'Endgame Strategy' and 'Mastering the Endgame, vol I & II', for general endgame play knowledge (rather than the theoretical endgame positions).

ghost_of_pushwood

That was like listening to somebody on a cell phone.

mickynj

Yes! That dialog read very weirdly. I assume that the other side of that conversation has been banned

sadkid2008
mickynj wrote:

Yes! That dialog read very weirdly. I assume that the other side of that conversation has been banned

dialogue*

Speak not the language of the peasants, or one day an undesirable transformation shall occur.

sadkid2008

I have also made a very helpful topic on endgames, as I am an endgame master and expert researcher of a sort myself.

 

https://www.chess.com/forum/view/endgames/closings

Jancotianno
Username333 wrote:

what about silman's complete endgame course?

Definitely would recommend that as well to the OP.

ghost_of_pushwood

 If sadkid isn't showing you mastery enough. happy.png

sadkid2008
ghost_of_pushwood wrote:

 If sadkid isn't showing you mastery enough.

It is much more than mastery enough. It is the golden banana which all the greater apes strive for

ghost_of_pushwood

How true!  What a nearly Cheetah-like thing to say.

ghost_of_pushwood

(Btw why did Tarzan name his chimp after a completely different animal?  I mean, if his kid was Boy, shouldn't the chimp have been Chimp?)

sadkid2008
ghost_of_pushwood wrote:

(Btw why did Tarzan name his chimp after a completely different animal?  I mean, if his kid was Boy, shouldn't the chimp have been Chimp?)

the chimp was his real son so he felt the need to name him something special

DeirdreSkye

Try to master fundamental endgames with Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual and then study Shereshevsky's 2 books "Endgame strategy" and Karolyi's "Endgame Virtuoso Anatoly Karpov: The Exceptional Endgame Skills of the 12th World Champion".

    Spend a lot of time and effort in these 4 books, play a lot of tough tournaments and you will be 2200(or even higher) in no time(no time I mean 2-3 years).

 

kindaspongey

"... before discussing the specifics of Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual [henceforth 'DEM'], a word of warning is in order. I must emphasize that this is a terribly advanced work that I don't think is a very good way for the average player to study the endgame. The majority of the examples are complex and position-specific, and neither the average student nor even strong masters will follow or play over most of the hundreds of positions that are given extensive analysis, not to mention the subvariations derived from those positions. Even when introducing 'the basics', Dvoretsky's approach is often more complex than is necessary for an average student, and in any case such a thick book will seldom be used for the sake of elementary instruction. The majority of the other material is frankly very difficult. So take note: I don't want to be blamed, in praising this book, for your purchasing something that you find intimidating, relatively dull, or otherwise unsatisfying. That said, if you are up to a real challenge and have a great deal of time to devote to reading and playing over examples you will inevitably derive great value from this work. ..." - IM John Watson (2005)

http://theweekinchess.com/john-watson-reviews/the-end-game-comes-before-we-know-it

http://www.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Dvoretskys-Endgame-Manual-3rd-Edition-78p3502.htm

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708233815/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review399.pdf

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/2703.pdf