How to get into things like Tactics, Strategies, and studying endgames.

CalmTraveler

So I have now learned a few openings. Or, I wouldn't say I have learned them since they are obviously much more complex than I have the ability to understand at my current level. Nonetheless, I find myself knowing what to play the first 4-5 moves in most of my games. I play the Vienna game, often the Vienna gambit, sometimes the London system, and then I play the french defense if white starts 1. e4, and the kings Indian at anything else.

Now there is nothing more I would rather do than just sit and fiddle with openings all day, but I have heard that if you really want to get better at chess, you got to study tactics, strategies, and endgames. How do you go about that? And what even is the difference between tactics and strategies? And... study endgames? You mean like first I have to learn what to as King and pawn vs king, then I have to learn what to do against King and pawn vs king and knight, and so on? My rating has grown with around 200 points the last month, and I would very much like it to continue the same way.

Thank you in advance

Alramech

Since you are a Gold member on the site, I would highly recommend looking at doing lessons related to the idea you are curious about (tactics, strategies, endgames, etc.)

For clarification about the difference between tactics and strategies:  Tactics are immediate, best moves that you can make; a common term for these is also "puzzles".  Strategy is playing good moves which provide long-term benefits to the position.  If you play good strategic moves over the course of the game, then tactics will naturally unfold and become available.

Alramech

There is also lots of content elsewhere for studying particular aspects of chess.  For instance, there are plenty of books out there to get into strategic play, specific openings, etc.  I would also make use of any free content on YouTube as well.

CalmTraveler
Alramech skrev:

Since you are a Gold member on the site, I would highly recommend looking at doing lessons related to the idea you are curious about (tactics, strategies, endgames, etc.)

For clarification about the difference between tactics and strategies:  Tactics are immediate, best moves that you can make; a common term for these is also "puzzles".  Strategy is playing good moves which provide long-term benefits to the position.  If you play good strategic moves over the course of the game, then tactics will naturally unfold and become available.

Thank you for the helpful reply. I have been doing puzzles the last couple of weeks, and i will continue to do that. 
Just so I understand you correctly, the strategy is like for example moving your knight or bishop to a square in which you think/know it will become extremely strong later in the game? 

chamo2074

Yes, the chess.com lessons are good. But what is better is the book: "Silman's complete endgame course" this book is amazing. As for strategical concepts, you can hang around the lessons and see if you find anything that summarizes those... but I don't think there are any, if there are, well then it will be difficult to apply them all. So the best way to study strategy I think is by watching knowlegeable players analyzing games, I recommend GM Ben Finegold's youtube videos, and Agadmator's chess channel, they are really good. For tactics, practicing puzzles on any chess website as a habit will get you really good, also make sure to know all the patters, there is a series for checkmate patterns I will recommend in next post I send. As for your opening repertoire it is really good. A mix of positional openings, dynamic openings, and gambits, I recommend you to know the plans in those particular openings, and then after you improve like 200 rating points, start learning a bit more theory IF YOU DID NOT GET IT FROM PLAYING GAMES AND ANALYZING YOUR GAMES, because I believe that you could try moves in your own games that fit the plans of your opening, and then realize because of the game analysis/opening explorer that this is theory, understand? Also Very Important to understand the plans in the opening you wanna ply. Now, I think I have done a good job explaining to you, I have a blog article about the french defense if you are interested, as I know a lot of theory in it, I also linked a series from GM Simon Williams, I am a really big fan of his videos and his opening repertoire in there, he is probably better than me to explain... Also he did a series about the King's Indian defende I will provide you with links as soon as i publish this

chamo2074

https://www.chess.com/blog/chamo2074/must-read-if-you-wanna-play-the-french-defense-1-intro-advance my blog about the french defense, I will post a variation each week hopefully.

https://www.chess.com/lessons/why-simon-loves-the-french/the-advance-variation series from a grandmaster about the french defense that I recommend

Series about the King's Indian defense that I recommend. https://www.chess.com/lessons/nakamuras-kings-indian-defense

Other series that I recommend https://www.chess.com/lessons/how-to-checkmate

Yutube Channels that I recommend: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL5YbN5WLFD8dLIegT5QAbA

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=grandmaster+ben+finegold

 

 

 

Alramech

Thank you for the helpful reply. I have been doing puzzles the last couple of weeks, and i will continue to do that. 
Just so I understand you correctly, the strategy is like for example moving your knight or bishop to a square in which you think/know it will become extremely strong later in the game? 

Yes, that is a good example thumbup.png.

RussBell

browse it...

Improving Your Chess - Resources for Beginners and Beyond...

https://www.chess.com/blog/RussBell/improving-your-chess-resources-for-beginners-and-beyond