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Rule on Recording Moves

SagebrushSea

The rule for recording move -- which I looked up -- states that you must move and then record your move.  Recently, I played an opponent who did the opposite -- recorded his move and then moved.

Does ignoring the rule make any difference?  Is it generally enforced?  Could making an issue be considered assholish?  I didn't mind and wasn't going to notify the TD.

Alramech
SagebrushSea wrote:

The rule for recording move -- which I looked up -- states that you must move and then record your move.  Recently, I played an opponent who did the opposite -- recorded his move and then moved.

Does ignoring the rule make any difference?  Is it generally enforced?  Could making an issue be considered assholish?  I didn't mind and wasn't going to notify the TD.

I believe it is within your power to notify the TD and request your opponent only record the move afterwards.  But, like you continued to say, I don't think anyone truly minds.  In fact, there are a number of chess players who learned from their instructors to record the move first in order to blunder-check and ensure the move was sound!

I know that in one of my local clubs, an exception is posted at our Open tournaments that players may record the move first.

 

SagebrushSea

Well said.  In fact, in our match, I began copying my opponent.  Writing, then moving, did give me a moment to pause and reflect.

It was only after our game that I looked up the rule.  I inquired about it from a friend, who told me that the rule had been changed to its current version some time in the past.

KMWS

At what point can you stop recording your moves ? i cant see two people in a time scramble recording moves.

daxypoo
usually, when you get to 5 min left on clock you dont have to record moves anymore
MegaGamer15

Does that mean OTB blitz games don't need to have its moves recorded?

DonRajesh
MegaGamer15 wrote:

Does that mean OTB blitz games don't need to have its moves recorded?

Usually, but usually OTB games are like 30|0 or higher, so its unlikely to see one below 5 min.

IMBacon
SagebrushSea wrote:

The rule for recording move -- which I looked up -- states that you must move and then record your move.  Recently, I played an opponent who did the opposite -- recorded his move and then moved.

 

Does ignoring the rule make any difference?  Is it generally enforced?  Could making an issue be considered assholish?  I didn't mind and wasn't going to notify the TD.

I used to write my move down, think about it, and then make a move.  But the USCF changed the rules to you have to make the move on the board, and then write it down.  Some TD's enforce it, comes dont.

MadLuc

I saw a guy forfeit a game at an OTB tournament because his 2nd infraction for that game was: He made a move, wrote it down, and his opponents reply was obvious, so he wrote that down in anticipation...the arbiter was called over and said that is illegal, bye bye.

jetoba

The OP has a US flag and there are some organizers in the US that allow (in non-FIDE-rated sections) writing then moving if the player plays the move written (or only changes it in very rare instances).  Good luck trying to find a FIDE-rated tournament that allows that.  This is something that has gone back and forth over the decades.  Originally the US was solidly move then write but in the 50s it changed to match what was allowed internationally and now that FIDE has changed the US has kind of lagged behind (the standard rule is move then write but organizers can allow write then move as an option for those players that are not using an electronic scorekeeping device - such device users MUST move and then write).

The other question about time trouble is that when a player is under five minutes AND has less than 30 seconds increment (or delay) then scorekeeping is optional.  If it is a multiple time-control event then the player must catch his score back up once the next time control is entered.

Unmentioned was when a move needed to be written after making it.  The general way of enforcing scorekeeping is that your score needs to be caught up through your last move before making your next move, so you can respond to your opponent's move and then write both your opponent's move and the move you just made.

RS1650-16k

Is the recording and moving to be done by the same hand ?  Or is my memory playing tricks.

Alramech
RS1650-16k wrote:

Is the recording and moving to be done by the same hand ?  Or is my memory playing tricks.

The same-hand rule applies to moving the piece and touching the clock.  Recording can be done by either hand.

RS1650-16k

Thanks Alramech , I could not remember where I had read it .

kingattacker3

Wow interesting stuff. 

PuffyFoot

it doesn't really matter I don't think. I just did this in a tournament and no one cared