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Will I Ever See 1000?

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dude0812
AbbyTheButcher wrote:

@idilis 

This is what I mean. I thought I was doing pretty well but I lost and am now down to 600 even. 

You started the game nicely, you followed opening principles while your opponent played nonsense. However, on move 6 several opening principles are screaming to play 1 move. Before I name the move, I want you to use this as an excercise in implementing opening principles and chess principles in your game. You have developed your pieces, you are much more developed than your opponent, you are 1 move away from castling while your opponent is 3 moves away from castling. This is my first question, what should you do in such a position? I am not talking about a specific move, but what you should do in abstract. Think about it for a moment and then continue reading.

Here is a hint, when you have more developed pieces, or better pieces in general, do you have open or closed center? When you are a lot closer to castling than your opponent do you want open or closed center?

Second question, if your opponent is playing on the side of the board, according to general chess principles, where should you strike more often than not, in the center, or on the side?

Take your time to answer these questions.

Here are the answers. When you are more developed than your opponent and you are closer to castling than your opponent you should open up the center. When it comes to the second question, when your opponent is playing on the side of the board, general chess principles say that more often than not it is a good idea to strike in the center.

With this information in mind, try to come up with the correct move on move 6. In the game, you played d3. Take your time before you continue to read my comment.

Ok, here is the answer, the move that both the opening principles and chess principles in general scream to be played is 6.d4 opening up the center, maximizing the advantage that you have in development. 6.d4 says to your opponent that you mean business and that he is not going to get away with his nonsense pawn pushes in the beginning of the game.

The reason why I payed so much attention to this moment is because that's the moment when you should take the advantage, if you give time to your opponent to consolidate, your development advantage will evaporate. Another reason why I mentioned this moment is because that was the moment to implement opening principles and chess principles. That was the exam moment, that was a test to see whether you have actually mastered opening principles or not. Chess is hard, mastering opening principles and general chess principles isn't easy, it is one thing to be able to recite them and it is another thing to correctly implement them in your games.

playonlinesecretly1

I did not have lessons and chess books when I was a beginner. I just played  long game 45 min each side against Chessmaster personalities; at least one game a day. I picked up openings from the program automatic opening responses and variations. In short openings and longer time control playing had helped me get out the beginner level.

dude0812
AbbyTheButcher wrote:

@idilis 

This is what I mean. I thought I was doing pretty well but I lost and am now down to 600 even. 

 

Now I will analyze the rest of the game.

8.Nd5 is a flashy move, intending to play Nc7+ fork if your opponent takes twice on g5. It is very nice that you were able to find that.

After your opponent plays 9..Ra5 the Nc7+ fork no longer exist which means that your knight on g5 is hanging. You played 10. 0-0 which blunders your knight on g5. The move that I would consider is Qd2 defending the knight. Dropping the knight back to f3 is fine. Nxf7 at first looks interesting because of the discovered check, but after 10.Nxf7 Kxf7 if you play 11.Nxc7 double check you will have to waste a tempo bringing the knight back to e5 and then your opponent can develop and challenge your knight immediately with Nf6 where either you will trade or lose another tempo.

Anyway, your opponent doesn't see that he can take a knight on g5 and instead he plays 10..b5

On move 11. black plays Nge7 again not seeing that he can take the knight on g5 as Nxc7+ is no longer a fork.

12.b4 I don't understand why you played, just because a move attacks the rook it doesn't mean it is a good move. Your opponent's rook on a5 is misplaced, you want your opponent to have a rook on a5 because his rook is useless there. His rook is only a target on a5, later you might play Qd2 and tie up his knight into defending the rook. That is good because Qd2 is harmonious move in general, it connects the rooks it defends the eventual f4 pawn push.

If I were you I would play 12.f4 opening up the f file for the rook. By the way, whenever you push the f pawn you need to be careful about the tactics on the diagonal.

13.Nxf7 is an interesting sacrifice, 2 knights for a rook and 2 pawns is ok, especially considering the fact that you are more developed than your opponent.

16.c3 and then d4 to open up the center is a good idea I believe, opening up the position when your king is safer than his.

19.Bxd5 is something that I would never play. You are the one attacking and applying pressure, you want to keep the pieces on the board. He can't get to your bishop on a2, you should keep it. I would play Qf3 instead, defending c3 with tempo because Qf3 attacks the knight on d5.

20.c4 just blunders a pawn for no reason but your opponent inexplicably plays bxc4 giving you a protected passed pawn.

On move 22 you played an interesting move, sacrificing an exchange (Bxf1) in order to play Qxg5+.

22..Qxd4 is a horrible move by your opponent, not only it blunders a fork (b5), this move also blunders the g5 pawn,  which leads to losing the c6 knight wherever he goes with the king. Even if your opponent wants to take on d4, he should of course do it with a pawn, he should make 2 connected passed pawns in the middle of the board by playing exd4 if he wants to take on d4 (which he shouldn't do now, but if he had the luxury to do it, he should definitily take it with a pawn).

Because of this you get the best case scenario, you take the g5 pawn, you take the knight, his king is unsafe, you have a protected passer and he doesn't have 2 connected passers.

 

On move 27 I would play Qxa4 or Rc1 in order to remove the passed c pawn, I don't see the point in giving those checks.

On move 33 you blundered your queen in 1 move and that costed you the game.

dude0812
llama36 wrote:

It simply takes time. You've played 182 games this month, which is great, but no one is rated 1000 after one month.

Wish I'd saved it, but some pogchamps person made a video about her progress. Her goal was to get to 1000. She got coaching and played a lot. IIRC it took her the better part of a year.

Perhaps advice is most useful for people who have been stuck at the same rating for a while... for example stuck for 1 year and 1000 games. You're improving, just give it time.

I've played over 100,000 games. If I gained rating after ever session I'd be rated, well, in the 6 digits... but that's not how it works.

It was Michelle Khare. OP doesn't know much time it takes to progress at chess. He shouldn't worry though, I also thought that I would never be an intermediate player after a week or 2 of playing chess online.

Sonnycantshoot
Yes you will.
toxic_internet
grunon55 wrote:

There are several things that help me when I hit a losing streak.

1.  Take a break.  If I lose 3 or 4 games in a row, I stop playing for a couple of days and do something else.   

2.  When I am consistently losing, it is generally because I have lost concentration.  When I am ready to start playing again, I play a couple of games against the computer.   I generally lose the first two until I get my concentration back.  When I have won a couple, I will go live.  This allows me to work out the kinks without affecting my rating.

3.  Be kind to yourself.  You are playing a difficult game against smart people and losing is part of the game.  

 

Best wishes.

 

THIS ^ is the sort of kind and helpful post that keeps me coming back to this site.

idilis
toxic_internet wrote:
grunon55 wrote:

There are several things that help me when I hit a losing streak.

1.  Take a break.  If I lose 3 or 4 games in a row, I stop playing for a couple of days and do something else.   

2.  When I am consistently losing, it is generally because I have lost concentration.  When I am ready to start playing again, I play a couple of games against the computer.   I generally lose the first two until I get my concentration back.  When I have won a couple, I will go live.  This allows me to work out the kinks without affecting my rating.

3.  Be kind to yourself.  You are playing a difficult game against smart people and losing is part of the game.  

Best wishes.

THIS ^ is the sort of kind and helpful post that keeps me coming back to this site.

this is more of a general mind/mood management advice that is not specific to chess.  this is what you're here for?

ok here you go.

PatrickHockstetter

Start a new account and say you're medium level it places you at 1200 automatically iirc. The problem is that you're winning games but your rating is too low. New account solves this.

Fizzleputts

I'm going to do tactics every day for the next week and see if I improve!

Knights_of_Doom

Two thoughts ----

1. Take several minutes break after every game.  I've come to learn that my brain is a bit dazed after a hard-fought game, but I'm not consciously aware of it.  A little break can make a big difference.

2.  It is well known in any sport that when you learn something new, your results might actually be worse for a while.  That's because it takes a while for your new stuff to assimilate smoothly with your old stuff, and until that happens your game can be a bit off kilter.

So in summary, keep learning, be patient, and give your brain regular breaks.

ZachGB

i suggest doing puzzles might change u rating

ZachGB

also start playing on chess boards and anaylyse your lost games

ZachGB

and finally take your time and read more chess books

HeroinSheep

Uh maybe someone else asked already but..

Why are you playing 60 min games?

Normally I suggest early beginners to avoid 10+0 or faster. 

15+10 and 30+0 are ideal imo... but 60 min is heavy man... And really no point playing 60 if most games end with both players having 50 mins on their clock so you didn't actually use the time to calculate deep.

I would start playing 30+20 and 60 min after you reach 1000, not before, because the game is so slow it becomes like a scientific thing where you try to be in complete control and we obviously can't at beginner level.

At this point in time need more games to gain experience, and it needs to be a game (which you play, like a kid) not a science project happy.png 

Play 15+10 with the same calm you play 60 min. Try to actually use the entire 15 mins (with increment it can normally be around 20). Use the time. By using it I mean in critical positions try to out-calculate your opponent, don't just play a move and hope. Allow yourself to think basic strategy and don't think about the clock so much. If you get in to time pressure as a result of this that will only improve you that's part of the game.

 

Good luck.

AussieMatey

12.Nf6+ followed by 13.Nxf7 traps and wins his Queen - Game over.

dude0812

Here is what I can tell you from this recent game of yours.

On move 7 you played an interesting sacrifice, I remember you saying that your idol was Michael Tal, so I am not surprised that you played 7.Nxf7. When I take a shallow look at it, it looks like it can potentially be a good sacrifice as you are ahead in development, you will be able to castle while his king is exposed and he is underdeveloped.

On move 10 you played e5 which blunders the bishop. Why? Because your opponent could take your bishop with check. Always look for checks and captures for yourself and for your opponent. Also, you want the center to be open, you don't want to play a move like e5 even if e5 didn't blunder the bishop. Yes, you attack your opponents queen but he will move it away and what have you achieved? You have closed the center which 100% benefits black as black's king is stuck in the center and he is underdeveloped.

On move 11 you are down a piece, so if you can avoid the queen trade you should probably do so, even if it means losing a pawn (the only way to avoid queen trade that I see is 11.Qe3 and then he can take your bishop 11..Bxg5 then you are forced to recapture by playing 12.Qxg5 and then black can take the pawn on f2. But hey, if you have sacrificed a piece, giving up 1 more pawn doesn't make your position much worse. His king would still be stuck).

On move 13. you blunder your bishop by undefending it by moving the h pawn to h5. Every time you want to push a pawn you need to see which squares will be weakened. If you do that, you will not be blundering your pieces in this manner and your positional play will get better.

On move 18, you played g7 which is just giving up. Your opponent was stuck before that move, you should have just continued developing instead. Your opponent can't move his g8 knight, nor his h8 rook and if he tries to place his other rook to f8 then you play g7 and you are probably winning in such a situation. Your pawn is a torn in your opponents position because it is on g6. If you keep calm and see what resources you have in the position and you see what is annoying for your opponent in the position and you try to make the position as annoying as possible for your opponent, then you will be able to turn around many chess matches. Good luck!

 

dude0812

On move 4 you played d5, d5 is a move which black would like to play but in this particular case it blunders a pawn. You need to count attackers and defenders. If your opponent has more attackers than you have defenders, you can't play the move. In this particular case, your opponent was attacking the d5 square three times, you were defending it twice.

On move 6 you play Nb4 which threatens the c2 fork but it allows Qxe5+ with check. When I play a longer game I  look for all the checks and captures both for myself and for my opponent before I make a move and then ask myself are any of my opponent's captures good after my move. Another thing which you should do if you want to get better is that when you  want to move a piece you should first establish what that piece is currently doing. Had you asked yourself either of those 2 questions, you wouldn't have played Nb4.

On move 5 you play h5 and you blunder the e pawn again. If you look for checks and captures you will not be making mistakes like this. This is a 60+0 game, you have the time to look for all the checks and captures before making each move. Such blunders should never happen (or they should happen very rarely) in 60+0 games, however, you make them basically every game that lasts over 30 moves and that is one of the major reasons why you are not higher rated than you are. Fortunately, there is a clear way to fix this issue and that is to always look for checks and captures both for yourself and for your opponent.

On move 12. your opponent uses a fork to win your knight. This is a very important lesson, when you have undefended pieces, you are vulnerable to tactics. The reason why this tactic existed is because the knight on c2 was undefended. Undefended pieces + exposed king = a lot of tactics. Which brings me to another reason why this tactic was possible and that is your king was still in the center. By paying attention to undefended pieces, or by looking at checks (or both, which is the best option) you will not be making moves like 11..Bd6 because you will see that 11..Bd6 blunders a tactic.

 

dude0812

To summarise the advice (tips) from these 2 games:

1) Look for checks and captures both for yourself and for your opponent. Establish what checks and captures your opponent will have after you make your move. If you are playing a 60+0 game it is a good idea to scan where all of your opponent's pieces can go to before making almost every single one of your moves.

2) Pay attention to undefended pieces. They are especially dangerous if you also have an exposed king. Pay attention to pieces which are attacked and defended. Pay attention to pieces which you aren't defending with pawns, but which you are defending only with other pieces. These are called undefended pieces of the 2nd type. All of this applies both to your own pieces and to pieces of your opponent.  Establish which one of your pieces and your opponent's pieces fall into these cathegories before making every single one of your moves. You have the time to do that, you play 60+0 games, not 3+0 games.

3) Before you move a piece you should first establish what that piece is currently doing. When you move pawns you should also see which squares (and pieces!) you are undefending. You should also see these same downsides for every one of your opponent's moves, it will surprise you how many good moves you will be able to find this way, by looking at the downsides of your opponent's moves.

4) When you move a piece you must see whether your opponent is attacking the square to which you are moving your piece. If he is attacking the destination square with a lower value piece than the piece you want to move, don't make such a move.  This is especially important if you are moving your queen. Another important thing is that if your opponent is attacking that square more times than you will be defending it after your move then don't play that move.

These 4 advices from your 2 most recent losses will serve you in many games. If you follow them and implement them correctly, along with chess principles that you already know, you will be rated over 1000, in fact if you correctly implement my advice from this comment along with chess principles that you have already heard, you will probably be much higher rated than 1000.

 

 

Griphin

Ya wanna get better? Learn tricks that people fall for, for instance...

 

dude0812

If my last comment is too long, just read the first sentence for each of these 4 tips.