chess etiquette

124224

When should you resign?  Some resign as soon as the queen is lost.  Some resign when a loss is assured.  But I, as a novice, keep playing till the very end.  At my level, I and my opponent need to learn endgame.  If I resign, I deprive my opponent endgame development.  I assume there is a certain level of play, that resigning is appropriate.  Where is the demarcation?

Feman26
Personally if I have no chance that when I resign. My experience leads me to that. I’ve won games where I’ve lost an early queen and won games after blunders. You have to have a feel for the opponent before deciding if you have a chance or not
AKnight01
Never surrender
124224

So, when I play to the end and don't resign, I am not breaking some chess etiquette rule then.

 

B1ZMARK
124224 wrote:

So, when I play to the end and don't resign, I am not breaking some chess etiquette rule then.

 

but make sure to resign if you lose your queen 

(queens gambit reference very funny)

StormCentre3

A rite of passage is a ceremony or ritual of the passage which occurs when an individual leaves one group to enter another. It involves a significant change of status in society.

Learning/ becoming aware of when it’s time to resign becomes a “ rite of passage “ for the chess player.

blueemu

Resign when you feel that there's nothing more to be learned from continuing.

StormCentre3

A good way to put it.

Fromper

Rule of thumb: There are two situations where you should keep playing, even if you're sure you're losing:

1. If there's something you can learn from playing out the position. For instance, if you're down a piece, but you don't know how you would finish off the opponent if the positions were reversed. Play it out to learn from your opponent's technique.

2. If there's a chance your opponent could screw up and lose their advantage. This won't happen if you're playing a master or grandmaster. But if they're not jerks, most of them will understand if you keep playing for reason #1, above. Against your fellow novices, they could easily blunder back, so feel free to give them every opportunity to do so. Against players who are between those two extremes, it's a judgment call, which is why it's considered a sign of respect to resign. It's like you're saying that you respect your opponent's skill enough to assume they can play it out without blundering.

 

Moonwarrior_1

Depends on your rating honestly at my level I sometimes resign if I lose a knight depending on my opponent. It all depends on postion but for the most part I consider it a sign of respect.

StormCentre3

Rules of thumb in Chess? Come now ... one may resign after a silly mistake early on- that day not wanting to battle on. Seek another game. Another day - decide to play it out being in a fighting mood. There is no rule of thumb. 

 

Optimissed
124224 wrote:

When should you resign?  Some resign as soon as the queen is lost.  Some resign when a loss is assured.  But I, as a novice, keep playing till the very end.  At my level, I and my opponent need to learn endgame.  If I resign, I deprive my opponent endgame development.  I assume there is a certain level of play, that resigning is appropriate.  Where is the demarcation?

Probably when you no longer have anything to learn from persevering with lost games. You answered it yourself!!