Help!!! I keep acquiring chess books but I never completed one.

ninjaswat

Oh never mind their account was closed today.

eliothowell

I have found it impossible to read a chess book with setting up the board.  Also, since they can be complex, I have found that i only do one chapter at a time or just one section in  a chapter.  Good luck.

tannguyen1991
ninjaswat wrote:

Honestly I've gotten to around 1500 OTB without really slogging through any books. I've watched plenty of videos and read articles to broaden my chess knowledge, however.

 

What videos have you been watching? Any good recommendations? Were they free or did they come from other websites? 

tannguyen1991
RichColorado wrote:

Chess is the most subject written about except for the bible . . .

Make a goal, buy a cheap club board and pieces . . .

Don't READ a book PLAY it . . .

The best book i see you have is Silmans Complete End Game . . .

Play games for one of your 35 Clubs . . . 3 day moves . . . Move on the second day not on the first, not on the third day . . .

No one can help you to play the book but yourself . . .

Bye

Rich

Hi Rich,

Thank you for the good tips! I appreciate it! How are things in Colorado? I heard that its beautiful there once Spring comes. Would you like to play a 3 day game? 

tannguyen1991
kantraband wrote:

Rare bookdealer here-- the value of the books depends on the condition, scarcity, and (of course) just overall desirability of the title. If they're first printings by Casablanca, for instance, and in very nice condition, they will increase in value over time no matter what. 

Oh wow. I didn't know that. I have a few questions. 

 Is it hard to start a career as a book dealer? Would I have to go to school as a librarian?

What would the value of these be if they had minimal ware and were 1st edition copies? Not saying that I own them, but I am just curious.

A Primer of Chess and Chess Fundamentals written by Capablanca, also would an autograph within the books make a difference?

Super Nezh: Rashid Nezhmetdinov, Chess Assassin 1st Edition. by Alex Pishkin?

I'm just curious and very excited to talk to a librarian. Library Science is a growing field as more things need to be archived. 

Thank you again!

tannguyen1991
Light-energy wrote:

NM i am 2745 in blitz how to make it 3000 blitz

 

Its ashamed that you account was closed, I was wanting to seek your story and what your journey has been like. 

tannguyen1991
eliothowell wrote:

I have found it impossible to read a chess book with setting up the board.  Also, since they can be complex, I have found that i only do one chapter at a time or just one section in  a chapter.  Good luck.

 

What was the most recent book that you finished? What was very useful that changed how you played chess from it?

ninjaswat
tannguyen1991 wrote:
Light-energy wrote:

NM i am 2745 in blitz how to make it 3000 blitz

 

Its ashamed that you account was closed, I was wanting to seek your story and what your journey has been like. 

They only played 14 games or so ...

ninjaswat
tannguyen1991 wrote:
ninjaswat wrote:

Honestly I've gotten to around 1500 OTB without really slogging through any books. I've watched plenty of videos and read articles to broaden my chess knowledge, however.

 

What videos have you been watching? Any good recommendations? Were they free or did they come from other websites? 

I've been watching videos by Gothamchess, Hikaru, agadmator, etc. all free. I use the chess.com video lessons occasionally, but not much.

tannguyen1991
EnergeticHay wrote:

@tannguyen1991 Glad I can help, I've got no problem with you re-directing me here 

1. You've got a couple great books in there. I would recommend reading Silman's Endgame Cours if you haven't already.

Yes, that is probably a good idea. Truth is, I only did the first two games of Capablanca’s Best Chess Endings for a 4-5 moves without a board in my head and got a headache. It is probably smarter if I start with Silman. So, I will start there, one step closer to improvement!

2. In terms of finishing a book, set up a goal for yourself. It should be manageable but not excessively challenging. Split the book up into chunks and deal with it that way. Maybe have a general end date for the entire book, and end dates for each individual chapter. Also, don't refrain from taking a break for a few days or a week if you're feeling a bit tired. Quality and quantity are both important.

Wow that is a different approach I never thought about. In school we are taught to finish a book from front to end in one setting if possible, so the idea with goals and end dates are very insightful. I just hope I do not burn myself out. I should probably start doing some cardio exercises to help my endurance.

3. I'll admit I don't know many of the books there, but I know that Silman's Endgame Course is good. Dvoretsky's is the endgame book after that (in terms of levels), so start with Silman's. However, you can always try any book you have, and just determine if you are going too fast or too slow. If you can't quite figure out if the book is right for you, maybe search online?

Well noted, I am using my Google-fu skills right now.

4. A real board is always good but not necessary. No matter what, you gotta set up important positions and look for them. Another good thing is to try to imagine the positions in your head (like variations) and then make them on the board afterward. That can help with your imagination and calculation.

Did you do any special exercises for your calculation of visual skills while becoming a NM? I’m thinking about buying a tournament set board or wooden board, but maybe I can just use an empty board like you mentioned for imagination.

5. Reading books in general is essential to becoming a NM or any higher-rated level player. I'm sure you can make it, but you'd have to study and learn from different mediums as well. Playing and analyzing games is important, as well as working on tactics, openings, etc.

I am working on building a list of chess videos to watch on Youtube, articles to read from Dan Heisman, GingerGM Videos, and GSerper blog. So yes, it’s a process, I just hope that overtime I can learn to think/read engine notation. Youtube has been Hikaru, Gotham Chess, Kingscrusher, and random videos here and there. As it appears that the youngsters are learning quite rapidly from these tools. Do you think one should start spending money on a coach at the 2000 levels or higher?

Hope that helped 

Thank you! Life and chess are so much easier when there’s guidance. Being self-taught is so difficult, because you do not have a path or not sure where you are going wrong. I really appreciate your generosity. This knowledge will be very impactful on my studies!  I hope to shake hands with you someday in person or get an autograph!

Your passion to make a difference in the chess.com community is unbelievable. You put your heart and soul into your replies and surpass any personal goals you could have set. Watching you do what you love and watching you make a difference in the lives of others is an incredible experience and I hope that one day I can have just as much passion you have or make a difference like you.

You inspire me to be the best version of my chess self. I look up to you. I feel that more people should strive to have the strength and passion that you exemplify in everyday life. I have never been more proud to know someone and to call someone my chess.com friend. You have taught me so many things and I want to thank you from reading this thread. Thank you for inspiring me in life. Thank you for making me want to be a better chess player.


 

 

tannguyen1991
ninjaswat wrote:
tannguyen1991 wrote:
ninjaswat wrote:

Honestly I've gotten to around 1500 OTB without really slogging through any books. I've watched plenty of videos and read articles to broaden my chess knowledge, however.

 

What videos have you been watching? Any good recommendations? Were they free or did they come from other websites? 

I've been watching videos by Gothamchess, Hikaru, agadmator, etc. all free. I use the chess.com video lessons occasionally, but not much.

Agadmator! He's been huge for me going from 1200 to 1300 a few years ago in rapid!

ninjaswat
tannguyen1991 wrote:
ninjaswat wrote:
tannguyen1991 wrote:
ninjaswat wrote:

Honestly I've gotten to around 1500 OTB without really slogging through any books. I've watched plenty of videos and read articles to broaden my chess knowledge, however.

 

What videos have you been watching? Any good recommendations? Were they free or did they come from other websites? 

I've been watching videos by Gothamchess, Hikaru, agadmator, etc. all free. I use the chess.com video lessons occasionally, but not much.

Agadmator! He's been huge for me going from 1200 to 1300 a few years ago in rapid!

I mostly look at the analysis they do for brilliant games happy.png

garbagem8

what is a chess book

ninjaswat
garbagem8 wrote:

what is a chess book

a book about chess

MelvinGarvey

I fell in that "buy books and won't read them through" long ago, and have find out, many chess players fell for the same trap. I sold then all my books in a tournament (about 100 books) at about 40% of their original price, and took a fresh start.

Buy only books that fit your actual needs, and read them through before buying an other one, except if it's a monography about some opening or opening variation: these are to be used like dictionaries or commented paper databases.

Avoid all books with ridiculous flashy titles, such as "samurai chess" (lol) or "Tao chess", or you'll end up buying "cooking chess" and "telepathy in chess for the aliens from outer planets".

On the cultural and entertaining side, I recommend "The complete chess addict", and some history books about champions and chess.

I could hint and advise more, but you would probably forget most of it all, so, i'll stick to that.

tannguyen1991
garbagem8 wrote:

what is a chess book

Well I found this definition, so it must be a book about this.



tannguyen1991
MelvinGarvey wrote:

I fell in that "buy books and won't read them through" long ago, and have find out, many chess players fell for the same trap. I sold then all my books in a tournament (about 100 books) at about 40% of their original price, and took a fresh start.

Buy only books that fit your actual needs, and read them through before buying an other one, except if it's a monography about some opening or opening variation: these are to be used like dictionaries or commented paper databases.

Avoid all books with ridiculous flashy titles, such as "samurai chess" (lol) or "Tao chess", or you'll end up buying "cooking chess" and "telepathy in chess for the aliens from outer planets".

On the cultural and entertaining side, I recommend "The complete chess addict", and some history books about champions and chess.

I could hint and advise more, but you would probably forget most of it all, so, i'll stick to that.

Please advise and hint, I am sure that chess.com will keep this forum in the records.
Did any particular one have any significance impact, that you can remember?

I guess I should probably sell some of the books, but I figured once I am old, I will have all the time in the world to read them then or I can look at them everyday, which I am slowly making it into a habit. Making things a habit, has been my key to success so far.

MelvinGarvey

I've seen much better threads than this one (no offense meant) deleted forever due to cc policy over mutes and bans.