How did Magnus Carlsen become a good chess player?

chessfuninGr4

He has exellent memory and an iq of 190

IronIC_U
By being born.

There is a really good biography video called simply MAGNUS. If you watch it, you you see how this kid from Norway rolls into India and beats Vishy for the world championship. It’s actually quite amazing.

PEACE!
chessfuninGr4

REALLY?

IronIC_U
Yes, watch the video. It takes you through his life from childhood all the to becoming a world champion, then even a fashion supermodel. It’s very informative, and inspirational. You will get a lot higher level of understanding about Magnus as well as other GMs by enjoying that great production.
DaniilKalabukhov

He started to learn chess when he was young, he had a great trainer, his father could afford his travels around the world, he was talented and he put a lot of effort in chess. The only talent or high IQ aren't enough to become a world champion.

LewisTu

I have a hard time believing that he has an IQ of 190. You always have to watch out for IQ inflation and scams these days.

DaniilKalabukhov

Personally I don't believe in IQ thing. Math professor might be perfect at math, but bad at everything else. Also if you study something all day long, you won't have time for anything else.

DaniilKalabukhov

Of course if you train your brain, you will be able to learn new things quicker and better, but I don't believe that someone can be born as a genius. The success is only about good conditions (money, physiological climate, time and health) and hard working

IronIC_U
They saw that Magnus had so much potential, his parents forked out the money to bring in Kasparov for lesson sessions. Can you believe it! Carlsen was taught by a movie star from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Those must’ve been some wild parties! Anyway, Magnus now rakes in over a million dollars a year. He is a massive income generator. This basically is why I believe he will defend and keep the title for one more round, but no more. He better ne saving now, because he’s probably not going to be able to hold on past next Defence of title.

But yes, he really is that good.
Laskersnephew

"I'm a perfectly normal guy, my father is much more intelligent than I am." Magnus Carlsen

Laskersnephew

"Therefore in 2011, Magnus leant from Garry Kasparov, former world champion through private lessons."

In January 2011 Magnus Carlsen was already the highest rated player in the world. There's a great deal of mutual admiration between Magnus and Karparov, and I'm sure Magnus got some benefit from his training sessions with Gary, but they both have said that they were different kinds of players, with very different approaches.

IronIC_U
Laskersnephew,
You missed the awe-inspiring, far more important point:

Kasparov was in “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” !


I am a total sycophant for those turtles, man. Don’t diss the turtles! Let’s stay on-topic...

PEACE!
Therohanmishra

i can play cricket 🏏 better than magnus

IronIC_U
In the biography video , they specifically point out that Magnus sucks at Cricket. So, congratulations. But no bragging rights...
Nicator65
chessfuninGr4 wrote:

He has exellent memory and an iq of 190

Hmmm, most elite GMs are characterized by an impressive disposition to work hard on their natural talents. For instance, they can evaluate a position fast and precise, which implies seeing the key positional and tactical features on it, thus allowing a precise calculation and problem-solving approach.

Memory and IQ do play a part but aren't the only "natural skills" required for success in chess. For that matter, not everything on the board "was seen before", making memory more of a "meh", while IQ tests do comprise several cognitive skills, and being high in some not particularly relevant in chess may lead to wrong conclusions about the player's capacity.

In any case, I find curious that most don't recognize the importance of tolerance for failure, strong nerves, and peak physical condition. The points: regardless of all God-given talents, if a player can't stand losing then he will quit chess; if he can't keep calm when making constant decisions in situations of uncertainty, then he will make mistakes or consume the clock... and if his body isn't pumping enough oxygen to his brain through several hours of hard mental work, he will get tired, sleepy, and mistakes will follow.

So you see, some tables do require more than two legs to work very well.