How to create tactical possibilities?

NotAGMPickles

It seems to me that studying tactics and memorizing is very important, but is there a method to create tactical posibilities? Or how to set up tactics? Are there any books and DVDs that you could recommend? Thanks in advance.

blueemu

Tactics flow from a superior position. If you want to create tactical possibilities, then learn how to make good moves and gain the advantage.

Against accurate play by the opponent, nobody can gain the advantage by attacking or by making sharp tactical moves.

Just the opposite: you gain the advantage by maneuver, and then convert it by tactics and attack.

NotAGMPickles

@blueemu Do you know a tactics trainer (free) that trains tactics by theme? Ty again

blueemu

I don't, sorry.

Fleece_Johnson

just be active and don't hang ur pieces

get in ur opponents face and don't blunder

Caesar49bc

NotAGMPickles:

I don't know of a free tactics trainer, but at least check out Chess King Training. It has an amazing amount of training material for the price.

NotAGMPickles

Thank you all!!!!!!!

Nicator65
NotAGMPickles wrote:

It seems to me that studying tactics and memorizing is very important, but is there a method to create tactical posibilities? Or how to set up tactics? Are there any books and DVDs that you could recommend? Thanks in advance.

Tactical blows (tactics are present in just about any situation) are about breaking down the defensive coordination of the rival's pieces and pawns, usually by the usage of tempos (maneuvers) or material (sacrifices).

By the definition, the rival's pieces should be defending and that leads to having a weakness (or weaknesses) in their position. To create such scenario the typical method is to play actively (which is a series of threats logically chained and supported by the situation of the pieces and pawns on both sides) to enforce concessions, in the form of misplaced pawns or pieces, or the loss of control of critical squares that the active side may (will) use later on as to maintain and, or increase the activity.

The problem you may find when using this method is that, unless you're playing against a weak player, he will concede little to none or –more likely– will work on forcing concessions from you. There's also the problem that to get the tempos to start a series of logically chained threats you yourself may need to concede something (material, weaknesses), and this requires a keen assessing of the "investment".

While active play is the fashion nowadays, it's not the only method. Tigran Petrosian used to work on depriving his rivals of any sort of activity while working on improving his pieces (and pawns) little by little at any good opportunity (when the rival wasn't threatening anything at all). His assessing of active play was that accurate that some Soviet GMs used to say: "When Petrosian starts an attack (meaning conceding something) you may very well resign without doubts".

NotAGMPickles

Thanks for the advice!!

najdorf96

Indeed. Guess for me, first and foremost, I don't arbitrarily look for tactical possibilities: I look for good moves. Starting from the Opening, I look for any deviation, or outright blunder going into the Middlegame, it could be some 8-20 moves before you can even fish for something: undefended piece, overworked Q, weak backrank, under developed pieces, king devoid of defenders etc. In other words, more or less being aware of tactical possibilities is key; opposed to "creating ".

NotAGMPickles

Ty!!!

Caesar49bc

There is fine line between good moves and tactics. One has to get out of the opening with a good position.  Even before that though, you should look at your opponent's moves with a critical eye. 

If your playing an opening your familiar with, and the opponent does some strange move you've never seen before, ask yourself how you can exploit it. 

 

NotAGMPickles

Thanks again!

NotAGMPickles

Ty, that was very helpful.

Caesar49bc
YareYareWawa wrote:

Piece development,  preparing your breaks or any other tension,  harmonious development,  clearing lines and files for your pieces to switch back and forth + be flexible,  preserving your options,  inducing weak squares,  recognizing and emphasizing weak square complexes, having a stable enough position for other things to not be important and having a dynamic,  preferably asymmetrical position

In other words, read "Reassess Your Chess" by Jeremy Silman.

NotAGMPickles

Thanks for the recommendation! Do any of you know a sorted Tactics Trainer (free)?  

Caesar49bc
YareYareWawa wrote:
Caesar49bc wrote:
YareYareWawa wrote:

Piece development,  preparing your breaks or any other tension,  harmonious development,  clearing lines and files for your pieces to switch back and forth + be flexible,  preserving your options,  inducing weak squares,  recognizing and emphasizing weak square complexes, having a stable enough position for other things to not be important and having a dynamic,  preferably asymmetrical position

In other words, read "Reassess Your Chess" by Jeremy Silman.

That's a good start actually but it's not a quick fix or even the best explanation

Exactly: A GOOD START

😁

NotAGMPickles

Lol

Caesar49bc

Seriously though, Reassess Your Chess is a good start. It lays the foundation on middle game strategy, which in turn lays the foundation of being able to create and see tactical possibilities. To be able to look at board and say to yourself "If I move this piece here or that piece there, I'm setting up a land mine if the opponent doen't find the best move".

Set enough of those, and there's a good chance the opponent misses one to your delight.

NotAGMPickles

KK.