I need a book...

Ty39wastakenlol

Thanks to all who posted! I’ve decide to go with Winning Chess Strategy for Kids by Coackley. I will maybe get other chess books that where mentioned, but for now going to get Winning Chess Strategy for Kids by Coackley.

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye wroteL

... kindaspongey tries to sell books. ...

False.

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye wrote:

... Because of that  Tarrasch book  is not so good and Tamburo's book is better. ...

Does DeirdreSkye see any previous post in this discussion where I have mentiond Tamburro's book?

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye wrote:

... kindaspongey ... He is trying to diminish Tarrasch book with the usual tactic of the "1001 meaningless questions". ...

Posts, #16 and #18, are not questions.

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye  wrote:

... kindaspongey ... has never studied any of the books that he recommends or Tarrasch book. ...

My primary intention here has been to make information readily available here.

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:
DeirdreSkye wrote:

... Because of that  Tarrasch book  is not so good and Tamburo's book is better. ...

Does DeirdreSkye see any previous post in this discussion where I have mentiond Tamburro's book?

      You have mentioned Tamburo's book in  500 beginner posts while Tarrasch' book in none, no?

I have mentioned Tamburro's book (along with many others) in other threads, but I have made no post in favor of it in this thread. Rather obviously, it is not the sort of book that Tigerfunx has been looking for.

kindaspongey
Klauer wrote:

... This is a question of content, not of age. ...

How many pages are there in the Tarrasch chapter on the opening? Has there been considerable change in opening practice over the last 80 years?

kindaspongey
pdve wrote:

I think there is a good book by Fred Wilson called Simple Attacking Plans that may fit the bill for what the OP asked for.

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090402/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review874.pdf
http://dev.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Simple-Attacking-Plans-77p3731.htm

I agree about the quality of the book, but, again, it does not seem to me to be a "book that covers everything from openings to checkmates for someone" at the level of Tigerfunx.

RussBell

@Tigerfunx -

From your profile you play primarily fast time controls.  That’s ok if you’re playing chess primarily for fun, and where your results are secondary.  But you are unlikely to improve significantly doing this; by playing fast time controls you have little time to think about what you should be doing.  If you’re seriously committed to improving, then I suggest that you...

1. Play longer time controls - a higher percentage of your games should be at the longest possible time controls, including daily chess...so you have time to think about what you should be doing...
https://www.chess.com/article/view/longer-time-controls-are-more-instructive

https://www.chess.com/forum/view/general/how-blitz-and-bullet-rotted-my-brain-don-t-let-it-rot-yours

2. Maximize The Usefulness of Your Moves....start to incorporate ideas like these in your play...

http://www.mark-weeks.com/aboutcom/aa06b18.htm

kindaspongey
blueemu wrote:

Back when I was a pooch... say, 1400 or under... I was given a few Fred Reinfeld books. By modern standards they are probably classed as "garbage", but I think they did me a lot of good at the time.

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5856bd64ff7c50433c3803db/t/5895fe49893fc0b0c9ddde67/1486224972320/completechesscoursexcerpt.pdf

pdve

In fact I should read some of these books. My blitz chess may be above average but my slow chess is garbage.

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:
Klauer wrote:

... This is a question of content, not of age. ...

How many pages are there in the Tarrasch chapter on the opening? Has there been considerable change in opening practice over the last 80 years?

     The way the brain develops skills has remained the same the last 80 years and will remain the same for a lot more(cognitive scientists like Gobet and Ericson say that , not me). Books like Tarrasch book will never be obsolete(at least not in the forseeable future).

In the chapter on the opening, how many of the 72 pages are on opening "skills" and how many are on specific openings?

kindaspongey
drmrboss wrote:

http://store.doverpublications.com/0486217442.html

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye wrote:
 kindaspongey wrote:
DeirdreSkye wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:
Klauer wrote:

... This is a question of content, not of age. ...

How many pages are there in the Tarrasch chapter on the opening? Has there been considerable change in opening practice over the last 80 years?

     The way the brain develops skills has remained the same the last 80 years and will remain the same for a lot more(cognitive scientists like Gobet and Ericson say that , not me). Books like Tarrasch book will never be obsolete(at least not in the forseeable future).

In the chapter on the opening, how many of the 72 pages are on opening "skills" and how many are on specific openings?

     Skills develop by creating a knowledge base (again according to cognitive scientists not me). In the chapter about openings Tarrasch gives a beginner what he needs to know explaining key moves and key ideas. It doesn't matter if the lines are outdated as the book attempts to help a beginner create his own thinking process by offering a huge amount of very important and useful knowledge that will never be outdated.

Could one benefit one's skills with opening discussion that is not more than 80 years old? And … about those skills … how would you rate the Tarrasch understanding of hypermodern skills? How about judgments like this?

"4.Bg5 is very strong [after 1 d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3 Nc3 Nf6]"

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:
DeirdreSkye wrote:
 kindaspongey wrote:
DeirdreSkye wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:
Klauer wrote:

... This is a question of content, not of age. ...

How many pages are there in the Tarrasch chapter on the opening? Has there been considerable change in opening practice over the last 80 years?

     The way the brain develops skills has remained the same the last 80 years and will remain the same for a lot more(cognitive scientists like Gobet and Ericson say that , not me). Books like Tarrasch book will never be obsolete(at least not in the forseeable future).

In the chapter on the opening, how many of the 72 pages are on opening "skills" and how many are on specific openings?

     Skills develop by creating a knowledge base (again according to cognitive scientists not me). In the chapter about openings Tarrasch gives a beginner what he needs to know explaining key moves and key ideas. It doesn't matter if the lines are outdated as the book attempts to help a beginner create his own thinking process by offering a huge amount of very important and useful knowledge that will never be outdated.

Could one benefit one's skills with opening discussion that is not 80 years old? And … about those skills … how would you rate the Tarrasch understanding of hypermodern skills? How about judgments like this?

"4.Bg5 is very strong [after 1 d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3 Nc3 Nf6]"

     As always it's difficult for an ignorant to hide his ignorance. There is no "hypermodern skill". This has to be the biggest nonsense of the month. Well done!

You can quibble about the term if you like, but I imagine that most know about openings promoted by Nimzowitsch, Reti, etc.

chess_cat_1000

The Chess Player's Bible by James Meade, along with tactics training on here or chesstempo, will carry you to 1500.

kindaspongey
DeirdreSkye wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:
DeirdreSkye wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:
DeirdreSkye wrote:
 kindaspongey wrote:
DeirdreSkye wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:
Klauer wrote:

... This is a question of content, not of age. ...

How many pages are there in the Tarrasch chapter on the opening? Has there been considerable change in opening practice over the last 80 years?

     The way the brain develops skills has remained the same the last 80 years and will remain the same for a lot more(cognitive scientists like Gobet and Ericson say that , not me). Books like Tarrasch book will never be obsolete(at least not in the forseeable future).

In the chapter on the opening, how many of the 72 pages are on opening "skills" and how many are on specific openings?

     Skills develop by creating a knowledge base (again according to cognitive scientists not me). In the chapter about openings Tarrasch gives a beginner what he needs to know explaining key moves and key ideas. It doesn't matter if the lines are outdated as the book attempts to help a beginner create his own thinking process by offering a huge amount of very important and useful knowledge that will never be outdated.

Could one benefit one's skills with opening discussion that is not 80 years old? And … about those skills … how would you rate the Tarrasch understanding of hypermodern skills? How about judgments like this?

"4.Bg5 is very strong [after 1 d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3 Nc3 Nf6]"

     As always it's difficult for an ignorant to hide his ignorance. There is no "hypermodern skill". This has to be the biggest nonsense of the month. Well done!

You can quibble about the term if you like, but I imagine that most know about openings promoted by Nimzowitsch, Reti, etc.

     The use of the term shows that you have no idea what chess is and you actually have never studied.

     All your meaningless questions have one purpose only. Promote the useless books that you want to sell by diminishing the really good books. 

I do not want to sell books. Does it appear that you want to discuss trusting Tarrasch to write as well as a modern writer about those openinings promoted by Nimzowitsch, Reti, etc.? Have anything to say about the 4 Bg5 quote?

kindaspongey
chess_cat_1000 wrote:

The Chess Player's Bible by James Meade, ...

Eade

kindaspongey

In the chapter on the opening, how many of the 72 pages are on opening "skills" and how many are on specific openings?

kindaspongey
Klauer wrote:
kindaspongey wrote:

In the chapter on the opening, how many of the 72 pages are on opening "skills" and how many are on specific openings?

All pages are about skills. ...

Is this a sentence about skills?

"To [1 e4 c5] 2.c3? Black can advantageously reply with 2...d5!"

You want to discuss trusting Tarrasch to write as well as a modern writer about those openings promoted by Nimzowitsch, Reti, etc.? Have anything to say about the 2 c3 quote? Think a beginner might be better off with a book by a writer who has seen some of the "expanding" over the last 80 years?