In a real tournment can you play 2 queens?

FearlessPawns

If your pawn reaches promotion in a real tournament (not by computer) can you really ask for another queen?

How in that case you play with 2 queens when phisically there's only 1 piece of each (do you put a pawn there and say "this white pawn is now, a queen?)

 

?

EricFleet

Yes, it is perfectly legal to have multiple queens. One can either borrow a Queen from another set or turn a Rook upside down. I've also heard of players using two criss-crossed pawns, lying down to represent a Queen, but have never seen it done outside of a scholastic game or two.

mapearson1990

If you watch any live coverage of chess tournaments, at each board there is a Queen of each colour at the side of the board for this eventuality. There is very rarely a need for 3 Smile

neo-metacrash

My firend tortured his opponent y promoting into 2 queens, 1 rook, a bishop and a knight, shuffled his knight, and did a mate he could've done ~20 moves ago. When his opponent asked why did he do the torture, he simply replied, "Well, it was your fault for not resigning like 20 moves ago."

Eseles

Of course you can have as many Queens as the pawns you promote plus your starting one.

I've seen top-GM-games with 2 Queens on each side.

piphilologist
EricFleet wrote:

Yes, it is perfectly legal to have multiple queens. One can either borrow a Queen from another set or turn a Rook upside down. I've also heard of players using two criss-crossed pawns, lying down to represent a Queen, but have never seen it done outside of a scholastic game or two.

In a tournament game, if a player promoted to an upturned rook, it would be a rook, even if he says it's a queen.

The correct procedure if there is no spare queen available is to stop the clocks and get the arbiter, who will provide spare queens.

neo-metacrash

Really? That's interesting!

EricFleet
would be a rook, even if he says it's a queen.

The correct procedure if there is no spare queen available is to stop the clocks and get the arbiter, who will provide spare queens.

In USCF rules per wikipedia an upside down rook is a Queen. I cannot comment on FIDE rules.
In addition, under US Chess Federation rules and in casual play, an upside- down rook may be used to designate a queen".
EricFleet

Having done a little more reading, under FIDE rules pip is correct. Under USCF rules, I am correct.

 

In USCF I have never seen spare Queens by boards... sounds like just a  difference in procedures.

piphilologist
neo-metacrash wrote:

Really? That's interesting!

Well those are the FIDE rules. The USCF rules tend to be significantly different to fide and I seem to remember reading somewhere that promotion to a upturned rook was acceptable in the US. Don't know whether it still is as I believe the USCF rules are being changed to align with FIDE more.

EricFleet
FirebrandX wrote:

The reason more than two queens is extremely rare in tournament play is because people have the common sense to resign before it gets to that point. Two queens per side is the norm and covers 99.99% of all tournament scenarios. I always carried two extra queens with my set in USCF events.

 


You've never TD'd a scholastic tournament :) I've seen some really weird things. But you are right... for anything for D players and up, I don't think I have ever witnessed three queens on a side.

EricFleet

See this for a master level game with six queens total

 

http://ratings.fide.com/pgn_chess_game.phtml?code1=700347&code2=12401676&code3=1&code4=46415&pgn_game=%22Szalanczy__Emil_Nguyen__Thi_Mai_Hung%22

JamieKowalski

My main set has a pair of extra queens, which is handy. But I've always considered an updside-down rook as perfectly dandy.

PawnPromoter316
piphilologist wrote:
EricFleet wrote:

Yes, it is perfectly legal to have multiple queens. One can either borrow a Queen from another set or turn a Rook upside down. I've also heard of players using two criss-crossed pawns, lying down to represent a Queen, but have never seen it done outside of a scholastic game or two.

In a tournament game, if a player promoted to an upturned rook, it would be a rook, even if he says it's a queen.

The correct procedure if there is no spare queen available is to stop the clocks and get the arbiter, who will provide spare queens.

 

I turned a rook upside down in the second-to-last tournament I played in. My opponent had no problem with it and recognized it as a queen since neither one of us had a spare queen

nyLsel

Yes you can. When playing chess tournament, each boards have an extra queen.

PawnPromoter316

The tournaments I've played in are BYOB - bring your own board (and clock.) The tournament organizers don't supply boards, pieces, clocks, etc. In one game, neither one of us had a clock, and I asked the tournament director what to do. He directed me to a vendor in the next room who was selling boards and clocks lol

nyLsel

LOL! What a style. Yes there are some tournaments that were BYOB. But when playing strong tournaments, or international ones, TD were the one who must provide the board and clock.

PawnPromoter316

Respectfully disagree - the World Open in July usually brings about three dozen grandmasters and the rules are BYOB; other tournaments, where the classifications go from a high of U2400 to a low of U1000 (along with an open section) are also BYOB.

If you're referring to super GM-only tournaments, I'm sure that's the case, along with zonals, interzonals, etc.

But all of the strong tournaments here in the US that I've heard of and played in are BYOB.

Think of how many chessboards and clocks and pieces the tournament organizers would have to lug around if the tournament were open to more than a couple dozen players.

PawnPromoter316
Shadowknight911 wrote:

in the US Barber K-8 championships back in August, one guy (who shall remain nameless, but rated highly) decided to punish his opponent and promoted his pawns - 4 queens - and stalemated.

 

Serves him right lol. Don't let Monster hear about that Smile

Vivinski

Chess sets should come with extra queens. It's stupid that most don't