Yusupov and the Older Lower Rated Player

igiveupnow

@kindaspongey - you thought wrong.

kindaspongey
"...  I thought that Beyond the Basics 1 was the 2nd book,  …" - kindaspongey
kindaspongey  wrote:

"... When we acquired the books, we originally only planned to publish one from each series. We all make mistakes. For this reason, the order which the books are intended to be read is not entirely obvious. The order is:

Build up Your Chess 1, Boost Your Chess 1, Chess Evolution 1 …" (2017)

http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/blog/?s=yusupov

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

kindaspongey

"... Fundamentals first, then Beyond the Basics and finally Mastery. Follow the colours! …"

http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/ebooks/QandAwithArturYusupovQualityChessAugust2013.pdf

igiveupnow

That is exactly what I meant. Beyond the basics 1 is the first blue book to be read from the blue series, ant at the same time it's the fourth book to be read overall after you're finished with the orange ones.

kindaspongey
igiveupnow wrote:

That is exactly what I meant. Beyond the basics 1 is the first blue book to be read from the blue series, ant at the same time it's the fourth book to be read overall after you're finished with the orange ones.

I guess the point is that there is not a book called Beyond the basics 1. I guess that it was intended, by that, to refer to Build Up Your Chess 2 (the 5th or 4th book, depending on whether or not one includes the Exam 1 book as the 4th). This confused me. Sorry.

msiipola

It looks like some think they can read a chess book, like they read fiction books. (One read, in a short time). I think this a mistake.

Many strong players says, weaker player doesn't need more information. Instead they need learn how to use their current understanding in practical play. Reading and gathering new information is not top priority. Instead they recommend weaker (=club) players to play lot of games AND analyse these.

Look at this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zp2bH0WS0Ko

 

 

madratter7

Finally broke 1700 in tactics here. happy.png It takes a while at 5 problems a day.

madratter7

@K_Brown

You are right that Black should have delayed taking the poison pawn one move. As you say, White is still better, but it isn't anywhere near total position meltdown, and at an amateur level, there are plenty of ways for White to blow it. The first couple moves are quite natural. But after that, White needs to find a way to keep the advantage.

K_Brown

That was what the computer said. I never noticed that nuance myself when I was looking at the position. It's always fun to dissect positions like this where a mistake occurred. Thanks for posting the position.

SmyslovFan

Congrats, @madratter7

 

madratter7

Thanks SmyslovFan!

I played another 120s/move game today against Komodo 12.2.2 skill level 11 (starts at zero so actually the 12th level of 20). I was reminded yet again how much I still have to learn. I ended up in an endgame where I could not find the win. In my defense, I think this one is pretty tough. The table bases say mate in 41. Black to move.

 

MagnutsCarleson
madratter7 wrote:

Finally broke 1700 in tactics here. It takes a while at 5 problems a day.

 

Congrats!

TrentHill
madratter7 wrote:

Trent: I'm without. I know I'm never going to be a first rate chess player. But I love to learn.  Feel free to post your progress as you go along.

 

Thanks for the encouragement! I had an intense couple of weeks at work and pretty much had to set everything that didn't have flames licking around it aside, but I just finished working through chapter 2 of Build 1. I picked up a copy of one of the books Yusupov recommends--How to Beat Your Dad At Chess--and read through it at bedtime. It's really useful. Between the two of them, I'm making slow, steady progress at tactics at chesstempo. 

K_Brown

 

Wow, difficult end indeed. Seems to be the following 6 step plan:

1. Get the king to where it can go to e5 at the right time (the d6 square).

2. Get the rook to where it can check the white king and defend the f-pawn (the f2 square)

3. Check the king and attack the bishop using the tempos gained to move the king to e5 at the right time.

4. Win the e-pawn.

5. Advance your pawn using common endgame tactics and make white sac their bishop for the pawn.

6. Mate the enemy king with K+R vs K endgame.

In some lines it is possible that you exchange the rook for the bishop and have a winning K+P vs K endgame as well.

Very interesting. This endgame revolves around the dark squares and attacking to create tempos in a way that reminds me of the K+Q vs K+P endgame where one side wins.

 

madratter7

What surprised me with this ending was how narrow the path was to victory. I would have thought that Black could diddle around before starting the correct moves. But it turns out that is not the case.

K_Brown

Oh? I thought the same thing. I would think black could diddle all day until the rook was moved. After the rook is moved you probably have to start finding the right moves.

madratter7

Yeah. Kh6 wins. Kh4 draws. As you say, my intuition would say any winning chances are preserved until a rook move is made. But that is apparently not the case. That is per Komodo 12.2.2 and per Chessbase.

SmyslovFan

There's a cool draw that not many people know with R+Cpawn vs B that's a draw. I discovered it in a book by Botvinnik. Here's one of the basic positions:



K_Brown

 

Interesting. Would it work on the e-file?

 

Appears so, but there is probably rook tricks. I'll put it in a tablebase and find out.

It does work for the same reason.