CHESS ETIQUETTE: Playing On In Ridiculous Positions, etc,

testaaaaa

If you play on lost positions against a super-gm

pumpkin_LN
Choleriker wrote:
Username333 hat geschrieben:

Is it bad chess etiquette to use conditional moves when playing daily chess?

Why would it be? 

What are conditional moves?

pumpkin_LN
Choleriker wrote:
Username333 hat geschrieben:

Is it bad chess etiquette to use conditional moves when playing daily chess?

Why would it be? 

What are conditional moves?

president_max
pumpkin_LN wrote:
Choleriker wrote:
Username333 hat geschrieben:

Is it bad chess etiquette to use conditional moves when playing daily chess?

Why would it be? 

What are conditional moves?

https://support.chess.com/customer/portal/articles/1444845-what-are-conditional-moves-

zenwabi

Thanks for posting that Korchnoi video, testaaaaa!

DevilishApples123

yes also you need to just suck it up you are going to lose

MikeZeggelaar

This is a ridiculous post.  I have been stalemated by A class players in completely lost positions, I have set stalemate traps for 2000+ players that they have fallen into.  I've seen masters miss simple mates and I've seen the most dead lost of positions been salvaged for draws and wins.
I once drew a easily lost K+P vs K endgame against a A class player, we are talking about a 1200 being able to win.  Players screw up all the time, even the most simple of winning positions.
I don't resign until I am facing mate in one or it is clearly obvious that my opponent has shown the technique to win.
Players shouldn't be shamed into resigning, I do admit though, the last time a junior didn't resign against me I made 3 bishops vs a lone king and mated her that way.

zenwabi

MikeZ, I raised 7 points of etiquette in my original post. You are responding only to the first one, which was:  "1) If your opponent has an insurmountable advantage, and checkmate is inevitable, do NOT play on in a ridiculous position, unless there is a reasonable chance for a stalemate draw.  You cannot play a chess game without an opponent, so show him or her some respect and do not waste his time by forcing him to play out a ridiculous position that does not even have a drawing chance for you." 

Please note I said do not play on in a ridiculous position "... unless there is a reasonable chance for a stalemate draw".  That should take care of your concern,

Another example. I played a kid age 12 - 14 in a tourney recently, and his position became totally hopeless. He had under 5 minutes left on his clock and I had 15 minutes. The kid started blitzing off his moves, smashing the pieces down on the board for emphasis. This is what I call ridiculous. He was totally busted, and he's smacking the pieces down AND pounding the clock? That's nonsense., and totally disrespectful to your opponent. If you are busted, and there is no chance for a draw, the honorable thing to do is resign and shake hands.

ghost_of_pushwood
zenwabi wrote:

MikeZ, I raised 7 points of etiquette in my original post.

Even Woodrow Wilson only had 14.

zenwabi

Woodrow was the man!

testaaaaa
zenwabi wrote:

Thanks for posting that Korchnoi video, testaaaaa!

wink.png

ghost_of_pushwood

Ah, the days when we actually had a prez named Woody...

TheUnderDog001

I didn't know adjusting pieces was only possible on your turn........ I also didn't know that only Black could set up the equipment.

zenwabi

Yes, that's Rule 10A. ADJUSTMENT OF PIECES. "A player who is on the move and first expresses the intention to adjust (e.g., by saying j'adoube or I adjust) may adjust one or more pieces on their squares."

The policy behind the rule is to prevent distracting your opponent when he is on the move, by fiddling with the pieces when he's looking at the board and trying to come up with a move. And if you've ever had a game with a player who wants to adjust every piece when YOU are on the move, you will appreciate this rule. I find most players will stop adjusting pieces when I'm on the move, once I tell them the rule and politely ask them to stop. Only once have I had to get a TD to come to the board and tell the hyperactive kid to cut it out.

The rule giving Black his choice of standard equipment is Rule 39A, CHOICE OF EQUIPMENT.  However, a digital clock is preferred in any game with a sudden death time control, so Black cannot force the use of an analog clock in a sudden death game. Also, another exception to this rule is a tourney at which the TD supplies chess sets & boards.

The policy behind the CHOICE OF EQUIPMENT RULE  is to discourage squabbles over equipment for the game that require the intervention and time of the TD. I find that most White players will pick up their stuff when I, as Black, arrive at the board before the start of the game. I don't always make an issue of it, but I have a digital clock with a move light on it that I like to use.