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I get stuck in same rating(800). what should I do to improve myself?

  • #41
    burakdemiroz wrote:
    Ashvapathi wrote:

    On second thoughts, I really doubt if people understand how one progresses from one rating to the next. Because if they did, no one would be stuck at any rating. But, most people get stuck at some rating or the other and they don't know what to do to go the next level.

     

    As a beginner, it is hard to find a way to get improved. That's why I asked you for help when I get stuck around 800. Now my rating is 1152 in daily games. But still I feel like I am not 1152, maybe I am around 1000. (1000 is also looks like good improvement for me) because I just played 35-40 games and I need to play more games with different opponents in my level to see that I deserve this rating. Maybe I played against weak opponents, maybe they couldn't focus on game and I won. I will play more daily games, puzzles and tactics. No bullet, no blitz. 


    But if I get stuck around 1200 for a long time and couldn't find to way to improve, I am sure that your advices will be a bit different. We'll see

    Daily games is not real chess. It's rating is irrelevant to chess skills. 

  • #42
    captaintugwash wrote:

    Study openings, particularly the more common ones. Once you're opening the first ten moves or so like a book, you'll find yourself in much better positions and will crush fellow 800s. As you find yourself in better postions, you'll get better at finding winning tactics. Good tactics flow from good positions.

    Having a decent position out of the opening is irrelevant if you drop a rook as soon as you leave book.  At an 800 level, it's pointless to know your favourite lines ten moves deep, as your opponents aren't going to know those lines and follow them that deep.  At an 800 level, you don't need a +0.3 advantage out of the opening.

     

    At that level, all you need from your opening is to avoid some traps and reach a playable middlegame.  General opening principles will get you 99% of that without learning much in the way of specific moves.  So learn some opening principles (develop your pieces, control the center, etc.), and then work on tactics.

     

    Once you reach 1400 or so, you can start to dabble in openings a bit more, but even so your main focus should be tactics.

  • #43

    At that level, you should try to lay opening traps for your opponents and watch out for their traps.

  • #44

    Relying on traps will get you some cheap easy wins against low-rated players, but it won't work against stronger players who will see through the threat.  If your strategy relies on those traps, you'll beat up on the weak players, but you'll struggle to improve beyond that level.

  • #45

    Well, this thread is about how to score against low-rated players... 

  • #46
    MGleason wrote:
    captaintugwash wrote:

    Study openings, particularly the more common ones. Once you're opening the first ten moves or so like a book, you'll find yourself in much better positions and will crush fellow 800s. As you find yourself in better postions, you'll get better at finding winning tactics. Good tactics flow from good positions.

    Having a decent position out of the opening is irrelevant if you drop a rook as soon as you leave book.  At an 800 level, it's pointless to know your favourite lines ten moves deep, as your opponents aren't going to know those lines and follow them that deep.  At an 800 level, you don't need a +0.3 advantage out of the opening.

     

    At that level, all you need from your opening is to avoid some traps and reach a playable middlegame.  General opening principles will get you 99% of that without learning much in the way of specific moves.  So learn some opening principles (develop your pieces, control the center, etc.), and then work on tactics.

     

    Once you reach 1400 or so, you can start to dabble in openings a bit more, but even so your main focus should be tactics.

    You make some fine points here, particularly in regard to applying general opening principles rather than specific lines of study, but to be fair one naturally develops into the other.

    And while you're right that opening won't help you if you drop a rook on move 11 or whatever, the advice there is simple... make sure the square you're planning on moving to is not attacked by the enemy. You can only tell people this, you can't teach them how to do it because it's obvious... look at the board, look at his pieces.

     

    If you're low rated because you drop rooks, then all you need to do to improve is look at where the enemy pieces are attacking.

     

    Personally, my rating improved a great deal when I started to cross reference my planned opening moves with a database. From the superior positions I found myself in, I was able to find much better attacking lines, and was able to maintain my defence better. Admittedly I was rated around 1400 when I started to study my openings, but I was up to 1800 rather quickly and have since crept past 1900.

     

    I've never been rated as low as 800, apart from maybe when I was a kid playing against adults, so I don't really know what you can do to improve from there, other than to remember to look at what your enemy is doing. That's how I lost so much as a kid... by only concerning myself with my plans.

  • #47

    You started studying openings at 1400ish - that's probably a good level to do so.  But when you're 800, you're not losing games because you don't have a superior position coming out of the opening.  When you're 800, you're losing games because you blunder material every third move, and miss much of the free material that your opponents are blundering.

     

    Simply stopping blundering material quite as often and taking more of the free material your opponents give you is by far the easiest way for an 800-rated player to improve.

  • #48
    burakdemiroz wrote:

    Hello everyone,

    I am very very amateur chess player(28). I've learned chess in primary school but just basics. This summer, I really wanted to be a good chess player. Everyday I am trying to play at least 10 games. For example, with this account I played 570 games (280W / 12 D / 278L) I have more than one account on chess.com also I am playing on other chess sites. My current rating is around 800. I am solving puzzles everyday but I think it doesn't help me anymore. I've completed chess.com courses but still I cant improve myself. Am I dummy? No I don't think so. I am software engineer and writing complex algorithms is kinda mind exercise for me. Also I am watching a lot of chess streams and I think it is a good because I understand see how GM is thinking. Anyway, maybe it is a common problem you've faced before, so I think you can help me and give some suggestions. Thanks in advance.
    BTW, sorry for my bad english if I made mistakes. It is not my native.

    Youre only allowed 1 account.

  • #49

    git gud happy.png

    have fun doing tactics and look out for free pieces u nub.

  • #50

    Quit

  • #51

    This will have been said but - learn from each game.  

     

    And every move.

     

    ...and watch the other guys eyes 

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