The Burden Of Proof...

The Burden Of Proof...

SonofPearl
SonofPearl
Feb 23, 2009, 2:51 AM |
15 | Chess Event Coverage

...is always on the accuser, and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov's serious accusations against his young opponent Igor Kurnosov in the Aeroflot Open in Moscow do not - on current evidence - appear to stand up to closer scrutiny.

Any suspicions of unfair play should be reported immediately to the arbiter during the game, not after the fact.  The game was being played on board 1 of the main event, so the arbiter should have been in close attendance.

Eye-witnesses report that rather than going to the restroom, Kurnosov was leaving the main hall in order to smoke in the foyer outside.  Smoking is not permitted in the playing area.  When the Chief Arbiter, Geurt Gijssen examined Kurnosov's coat he found only his cigarretes, lighter and a pen.  Experienced players have found nothing extraordinary about Kurnosov's moves during the game.

Mamedyarov was obviously suspicious of his opponent's behaviour and understandably upset at losing the game, but the evidence for any wrongdoing on Kurnosov's part is remarkably flimsy.

Suspicions of computer-aided cheating cannot and must not be allowed to destroy chess competition.  Strict measures to prevent cheating must be rigorously enforced so that competition is not only fair, but seen to be fair.  The rules should be clear and consistently enforced so that the guilty are caught and the innocent are not falsely accused.  Only in this way can the game survive in the modern era.

More from SonofPearl
Chess.com News Is Changing...

Chess.com News Is Changing...

Beijing To Host 5th 2012/13 Grand Prix

Beijing To Host 5th 2012/13 Grand Prix