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Why did they hate chess?

The long quote by Poe (pictured here) seems to indicate he knew how to play both chess and checkers, and that he didn't know what he was talking about. I like checkers BTW but his comparison of the games is nonsensical drivel...was he a disgruntled chessplayer? Objectively checkers is considerably less complex than chess, and the proof is that computers have now established that checkers, like tic-tac-toe and unlike chess and go, is a "closed strategy game." 

"To calculate is not in itself to analyse. A chess player, for example, does one without effort of the other. I will therefore take occasion to assert that the higher powers of the reflective intellect are more decidedly and more usefully tasked by the unostentatious game of draughts than by all the elaborate frivolity of chess. In the latter, where the pieces have different and bizarre motions, with various and variable values, what is only complex is mistaken for what is profound. The attention is here called powerfully into play. If it flag for an instant, an oversight is committed resulting in injury or defeat. The possible moves being not only manifold, but involute, the chances of such oversights are multiplied; and in nine cases out of ten it is the more concentrative, rather than the more acute player who conquers.In draughts on the contrary, where the moves are unique and have little variation, the probabilities of inadvertence are diminished, and the mere attention being left comparatively, unemployed, what advantages are obtained by either party are obtained by superior acumen" EDGAR ALLAN POE

"The best chess-player in Christendom may be little more than the best player of chess but proficiency in whist implies capacity for success in all those more important undertakings where mind struggles with mind." EDGAR ALLAN POE

"A great chess-player is not a great man, for he leaves the world as he found it. No act terminating in itself constitutes greatness. This will apply to all displays of power or trials of skill, which are confined to the momentary, individual effort, and construct no permanent image or trophy of themselves without them."

WILLIAM HAZLITT (British Writer, best known for his humanistic essays. 1778-1830)

"Lifes too short for chess" HENRY JAMES

“Chess may be the deepest, least exhaustible of pastimes, but it is nothing more. As for a chess genius, he is a human being who focuses vast, little-understood mental gifts and labors on an ultimately trivial human enterprise.”                                                                                               GEORGE STEINER, US Critic, Scholar and Educator

"Chess is a foolish expedient for making idle people believe they are doing something very clever, when they are only wasting their time"   GEORGE BERNARD SHAW  (1856 - 1950, Irish literary Critic, Playwright and Essayist; 1925 Nobel Prize winner for Literature)

"Chess is the most elaborate waste of human intelligence outside of an advertising agency."  RAYMOND CHANDLER (American Writer, author of detective fiction,1888-1959) BUT his famous detective Philip Marlowe played chess! In fact he is the "source" of this quote in Chandler's novel "The Long Goodbye"

Comments


  • 20 months ago

    NM GargleBlaster

    Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men really annoyed.

  • 20 months ago

    Mylobage

    "Chess is a foolish expedient for making idle people believe they are doing something very clever, when they are only wasting their time"   GEORGE BERNARD SHAW 

    This is the most accurate statement I've heard. Pepople believe Chess is something otherworldy; aside from a game.

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Cool

  • 20 months ago

    diogens

    Doc House was a very awesome chess player, musician among other things Innocent

  • 20 months ago

    NimzoRoy

    They did not like chess beacuse they were patzers....JohnderriLLL

    I'm sure that Raymond Chandler liked chess, and his quote is tongue-in-cheek I've read several (or more) of  his detective novels and his fictional detective Philip Marlowe occasionally looks over a chess game by Alekhine or some other GM in them.

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Cry

  • 20 months ago

    JohnderriLLL

    They did not like chess beacuse they were patzers....

  • 20 months ago

    diogens

    chess or poker?

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Sealed

  • 20 months ago

    NimzoRoy

    @PrimalPattern Speaking of "intellectual effort devoid of purpose" that describes Ayn Rand perfectly, aside from the fact she was a stupid, selfish, wealth-worshipping asshole - and those were here good traits. BUT I never knew about her open letter to Spassky, thanks for posting it! Now I have another reason to hate her guts!Tongue Out

    “Ayn Rand's 'philosophy' is nearly perfect in its immorality, which makes the size of her audience all the more ominous and symptomatic as we enter a curious new phase in our society.... To justify and extol human greed and egotism is to my mind not only immoral, but evil.”   GORE VIDAL

    Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, doubtless two of the most exquisitely adolescent of fictions.”  NANCY MAIRS

    I have to say I found Ayn Rand’s philosophy laughable. It was "a white supremacist dreams of the master race," burnt in an early-20th century form. Her ideas didn’t really appeal to me, but they seemed to be the kind of ideas that people would espouse, people who might secretly believe themselves to be part of the elite, and not part of the excluded majority.  ALAN MOORE

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Cry

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

  • 20 months ago

    captdad12

    Chess is good for exercising ones mind. And chess helps teach kids to plan ahead--a value not lost in real life application. Studies show the younger the child, the harder it is for them to grasp how their actions affect the future and if they play chess it can really help them to learn this earlier.

     In a way, you could say it gives your mind exercise and even wisdom!

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Cry

  • 20 months ago

    mistermax

    A long time ago I read an analysis of Poe's quote (by Horowitz maybe?).  The writer said that he was suddenly struck by the realization that Poe barely knew the moves.  All his comments about "bizarre motions" and "various and variable values" and the constant danger of a mental mistake indicated that he was still at the stage that he was trying to remember how the pieces moved.  I don't if it is true but it is an interesting perspective.

  • 20 months ago

    PrimalPattern

    "Unlike algebra, chess does not represent the abstraction–the basic pattern–of mental effort; it represents the opposite: it focuses mental effort on a set of concretes, and demands such complex calculations that a mind has no room for anything else. By creating an illusion of action and struggle, chess reduces the professional player’s mind to an uncritical, unvaluing passivity toward life. Chess removes the motor of intellectual effort–the question “What for?”–and leaves a somewhat frightening phenomenon: intelletual effort devoid of purpose."  - Ayn Rand, from her open letter to Boris Spassky during the 1972 WCC

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Undecided

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Cool

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Foot in Mouth

  • 20 months ago

    kinimaru

    Cry

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