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Practice Game

  • cjus
  • | Jan 4, 2009 at 2:26 AM
  • | Posted in: cjus's Blog
  • | 624 reads
  • | 5 comments

The following is a practice game. White recieved help from several people while Black played nonchalantly to his own detriment. The game is full of twist and turns and illustrates the old chess adage that "the most difficult game to win is a won game".

Comments


  • 6 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    * Check that: I stand corrected ... got over happy ... Black's White Bishop prevents movement to e2 if it drops down and then the Black's Black Bishop has threatening potential, as well ... Wow ... that puzzle/game was fun ... proves the adage: "The toughest game to win is the game that's already won!" (in other words ... I guess it did take 44 moves for White to win ... and if Black was playing non-chalantly ... wonder what he/she plays like when they are on fire !

    Here! Here! To Cjus on a game and topic well proven !!

    Thank you again for sharing.

    Peace.

  • 6 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    hmmm ... I would have played King to e1 to cut the Queen's distance down ... Queen calls check at b1 ... King responds e2 ... Queen to a-b-c 2 + ... and Bishop to e2 to block.

    By the time the rook comes over to aid the Queen ... Rook at h6 x h7+ and then Queen to g6+ the h5#.

    I think that works. 

    Thank you for your analysis. The diagram board was an excellent tool in this final sequence of moves. [Now that's what I call ... team work !!].

    Peace

  • 6 years ago

    cjus

    progressive_grove, Rh6 allows black to force a draw in a winning position for white.

  • 6 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    * Check that: Queen to g6 then to h5 #.

  • 6 years ago

    Progressive_Groove

    Wow ! White could have put this game away early on move from move 19-20.

    With the Rook at f6 after Bishop check at f7 and Black moves out of check (with Rook at f6) Rook to h6 would have put the Dark Opponent in a game ending situation, since: pawn x h6 results in Queen to g8 #. Even if Dark ingnores the pawn-rook capture and moves white Bishop to a6, Black then plays R x h7 + and the response is King x h6 with White playing Queen to g6 # ... ... ... maybe the players playing White panicked, or perhaps ... ... ... it was White who was playing non-chalantly !!

    Intriguing article ... thank you for sharing.

    Peace

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