The horrors of a drawoffer.

The horrors of a drawoffer.

Artsew
Artsew
Jan 14, 2010, 10:18 AM |
2

I just posted the following on my website, for the full article click here.

The horrors of the drawoffer.

In many sports draws are very rare. In most races for example it almost never happens, in boxing and other fighting sports it occasionally occurs. There are even sports where a draw simply is not possible Like in baseball and tennis. However in sports like hockey or world's most popular sport, football (soccer for the US-inhabitants) draws are more common. After 90 minutes off play teams may level in score and thus a draw is the result.

One of the unique sides of chess is that it is one of the few sports in which during full play both players can agree to stop competing and walk away with a draw.

Considerations may be, getting some mental rest for the day, getting that half point against that much better player. (I've foolishly done this myself). Or offcourse getting a draw secures your (team)win. Whatever the reason's might be, you are always biting yourself in your behind!

 

 

 

The horrors of offering a draw

When you offer a draw you are doing the following awfull things:

*) You are stating that according to you, your opponent has equal or better winning chanches.

Even if this is true, does it sound wise to notify your opponent about this?

*) You are showing willingness to stop fighting

Hopefully you are not matched with a player who has the "I-want-to-win-at-all-costs" attitude. He will probably eat you alive

*) You are handing over the initiative!

This may sound like a joke, but it is the 100% truth because your opponent now decides wether you are allowed to make another move or not.

*) The most awfull thing that can happen is that your opponent accepts the offer

How can this be a disadvantage you ask? Well quite simply you did not play till the end. Let's explore three likely options....

Click here to read the rest