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Topic of the Day-11/18/11

BlueGator456
Nov 18, 2011, 4:49 AM 4

Topic of the Day-11/18/11-How Chess relates to Real War

Okay, as I was playing Chess today, I noticed how Chess related to real war in real life. Well, if you read all of my blog that I posted yesterday, I said something about a Native Indian game that translates into "Four Battles" or "Four Armies" (Now I think it translated into "Four Wars"). Well anyways, that game was probably based on wars within their tribe and wars with other tribes. They also probably used that game to settle out their differences with fake war, so less blood was shed, and less damage was done. So my point is the origins of Chess came from a Native Indian game that was based on war. Well, Chess is like simulated Medieval War with the pawns, and the queens, and the bishops, etc. Well, I noticed that Chess relates to war in other ways, too. It relates to war because stacked pawns are like lines of soldiers getting ready to attack the enemy to conquer their trenches in World War 1, bishops put right together are like laser beams in Star Wars because only queens and rooks can past them, (maybe pawns and other bishops and maybe knights) and castled kings with all pawns in front of them, no escape spaces, is like the President in a Bomb Shelter during rough times of war. There are many ways that Chess relates to real war, so if you have any other ideas about how Chess relates to real war, please post a comment on this blog post! I will give you some more ways that Chess relates to real war. Well, pawns are like the king's servants, so basically they are poor, weak, unpaid soldiers, (that's why they can only move 1 space except on their 1st move) knights are soldiers on horseback, (horses can move fast when they turn, so an "L" is like a square curve) I am not sure what bishops are, but I think they are important to the king, I don't know what rooks are, so I am skipping that, too, and queens are so powerful because they want to help their husband, the king, to stay alive (or the inventor of Chess was a girl, and she wanted to show that girls could fight in war, too Smile). The king is the piece to win or lose because you and the opposing side don't want to destroy the other side's army because the leader will still be alive and they could still come up to power. Well, I am think I am done with this blog today. I don't know what Topic I will post about tommorrow, but I think I might post it on different checkmates or another feature of Chess.com. If you have any suggestions, please send me a message or drop a note on my profile. If you have any comments, please comment on this blog post at the bottom. Thanks for reading all of this blog!

-BlueGator456

 

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