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Common Mistakes In The Opening

Common Mistakes In The Opening

GMSeaslessspark
Mar 17, 2016, 7:30 AM 12
Do you focus on playing a vast number of openings? Do you skip over unfavorable lines?
 
As chess players, we make common mistakes while studying, preparing, or playing our openings. Here are some common mistakes you may be making.
1.Quantity over quality.
 
It is so easy to just study a different opening every week. Although this gives us a great variety and an extensive repertoire, we should look for quality over quantity. It's important to know each and every one of your openings as best as you can.
 
When I was younger I analyzed most of Bobby Fischer's games and I noticed that although his repertoire was vast, he focused primarily on 1.e4.
 
Bobby Fischer
 
2. Ignoring unfavorable lines.
 
When we study openings, we tend to skip over unfavorable lines, thinking no one will use them.
 
Unfortunately, here is where we make mistakes. The unfavorable lines may seem dubious to you but to someone else they are not. If I had a dollar for every time I was told "oh that is not a good variation" only to lose against it, I would be rich! 
 
Blunders and mistakes in a game are not blunders and mistakes unless you notice them. Usually when your opponent uses unfavorable lines, they are hoping that they know more about them than you do. Therefore, if you do not look out for unfavorable lines, you will never know how to capitalize on them. Not every opponent we play is a master. Keep that in mind.
 
3. Forgetting your own style.
 
When we study master games containing the same openings we play, we tend to copy every single move. We eventually forget to add our own style to the game because we are so caught up in playing just like the master. We have to understand that we are not that player. Each and every one of us has a different style of playing chess.
3. Forgetting your own style.
 
When we study master games containing the same openings we play, we tend to copy every single move. We eventually forget to add our own style to the game because we are so caught up in playing just like the master. We have to understand that we are not that player. Each and every one of us has a different style of playing chess.
 
For example, when I first started to study Paul Morphy's games, I wanted to play just like him.
Paul Morphy
 
I would sacrifice everything I could and play as aggressively as possible, but most of the time it did not work. I had to learn that I was not Paul Morphy! I focused on learning the ideas behind his play but also added my own personal style.
 
4. Focusing too much on the opponent. 
 
When preparing for an opponent, we tend to make drastic opening changes. We get caught up in trying to stop our opponents from achieving their goals on the board and we forget what we want to do.
 
It is very risky to make opening changes in our preparation before a round. It is not impossible, but it is risky. It is extremely important to play your game by playing what you know instead of focusing on playing what you do not.
 
Remember the opening sets the tone for the game. Do not make these common opening mistakes while studying, preparing, or playing your openings. I hope you learn from my experiences and incorporate them into your game.
Hope you enjoyed it!

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