Oversimplification of 1. e4

Oversimplification of 1. e4

PowerThroughIt
PowerThroughIt
Dec 5, 2015, 11:20 AM |
0

I often hear people describe 1. e4 as an opening with incredible attacking opportunities. To a certain degree, this is true, however, that description alone does not encompass the full nature of 1. e4. Rather, 1. e4 is an opening that is highly developed in theory, and can be swayed by white into a positional or dynamic game. Chances are, your opponent will know exactly what to play against this theoretical behemoth because so many people have studied this opening. However, if you understand the basic ideas behind the main lines, then you will be able to command the nature of the game, whether positional or dynamic.

 

          Bear in mind that this post is an oversimplification of what you need to know for 1. e4. The better you become, the more you will have to know about the opening. However, this is an excellent place to start, if you are considering picking up the opening. I will touch on some of the ideas that are vital to understanding this opening, but I encourage you to look into your own interests with 1. e4. Familiarize yourself with a basic position that arises from 1. e4. 

 

1.    e4 e5: Focus on development and making constant improvements to your position. These types of games involve a slow buildup followed by some opportunity to attack.


a.    Like This:

 


b.    Avoid This:

 



 

2.    e4 e6: Focus on development, holding your center, and looking for pawn breaks. These types of games involve quick development followed by either an opportunity to attack black’s kingside, or a closed maneuvering game.


a.    Like This: 

 



b.    Avoid This:

 



 

3.    e4 c5: Focus on breaking in the center with d4. This is one of the most theoretically-based openings, so I strongly suggest you find some strategic plan successfully employed in the past, and start off by employing that plan in future games. These games are unique because often times, if white does not know what he is doing, black will get a quick advantage.


a.    Like This:

 


b.    Avoid This:

 



 

4.    e4 d5: Focus on using your superior development advantage to take strong control of the center. Black will often try to attack this center later on. These types of games involve an initial maneuvering stage followed by a cat and mouse attacking game. Play patiently, but always look out for an opportunity to attack.


a.    Like This:

 


b.    Avoid This:

 

 

5.    e4 c6: How you play is based on style. For those of you who are positional, focus on closing up the position. While, those of you who enjoy more open positions, focus on trading pawns in the center for attacking opportunities. These types of games involve a rapid succession of center breaks followed by both sides trying to use the advantage they get out of the opening.


a.    Like This:

 


b.    Avoid This:

 




Every opening has its fair share of unorthodox lines that you will also have to learn. These unorthodox lines are not part of the central ideas of the opening, so I will not discuss them here. However, I strongly suggest you look at some of the games in unorthodox openings, and I wish you the best of luck in your future endeavors with 1. e4.