Miguel Najdorf: An Unsung Hero, (Part 1)

Miguel Najdorf: An Unsung Hero, (Part 1)

kamalakanta
kamalakanta
|
15

Dear readers, I was casually reading the book "Najdorf: Life and Games", and came across a wonderful game, with notes by Najdorf, and it inspired me to share it with you. Tonight, looking at Najdorf's notes more closely, I realize that he has something in common with some of the players I love the most: Tartakower, Bronstein and Tal.

What he has in common with these great players is this: They are all great teachers! These wonderful people seem to be able to communicate and inspire the love of chess to us, the readers, in a manner selfless and humble.

What impresses me about Najdorf, Tal, Tartakower and Bronstein is that they write in a simple manner, and share deep concepts about the game, without pretensions or arrogance, in a friendly manner. Their writing is at once personal and professional; technical and artistic.

Leafing through this book, I am amazed at how strong Najdorf was! But being that I have a very limited amount of time, I want to begin by sharing one game with you.

The game was played in the First Piatigorsky Cup in Los Angeles, USA, in 1963. Keres had just shared 2nd and 3rd places in the Curacao Candidates Tournament in 1962, so he was at the top of his strength. The way that Najdorf dominated this game is almost embarrassing, for a player of Keres' caliber!

So here we go!