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Yakimych vs. lebesgue72: Bogo Indian defense: 12/27/14

lebesgue72
Dec 28, 2014, 11:04 AM 1

Hi everyone! This is a game I played yesterday. My opponent opened with d4, and I decided to play Nf6 to learn more about the ideas and tactics that can come up in this kind of opening. Then there was c4. At this point, white's pawns on the queenside look slightly menacing, and I struggled to see what kind of future my bishop could have. Maybe that's something that's best not to think of in that way. I delayed castling, which ran into unpleasant tactics later on, with a queen check by white, with them picking up my a-pawn. I would definitely prioritize castling earlier, next time I get into a similar position. I decided to capture towards the center, and with my knight, which left me with a tactically vulnerable pawn on d6. Maybe this is something to be more tactically wary of next time, and perhaps not get this type of pawn, when there are similar tactics in the background. There were back-rank mate issues, which tied down my pieces. I exchanged queens at a moment when it probably would have been better to play a Rc8 move. From there, the weak d6 pawn was picked up. The main lessons are to castle earlier, to be aware of tactics when you're creating a pawn imbalance with a potentially weak pawn on d6, if it can't get moving successfully(and also to avoid making white's d-pawn passed, since it's further along than your own in this case), and exchanging queens when there's tactics and back-rank mae issues isn't always advisable; in fact, there wasn't a good reason to do it here. In summary, the delayed castling really played a big role here, revealing itself via tactics as the game progressed. Also, there was a Nf1 defense move to be aware of for future games, and maybe to try myself in some situations. Here's the game:



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