Chess960 Opening and Middlegame Principles

Chess960 Opening and Middlegame Principles

miriskra
miriskra
Mar 19, 2016, 2:48 AM |
0

Chess960 Opening Principles #1: Develop your own forces to good positions as fast and effectively as possible, while trying your hardest to stop your opponent from doing the same.

Explanation: It is not difficult to see that the most favourable points are located in the centre of the board - the central squares represent the most convenient stronghold for stationing the forces. The issue of the centre is all the more crucial in the opening because, in the starting position, this sector of the board is vacant - which presents both sides with an imperative to fight for it and conquer it. For this very reason the centre is the principal theatre of warlike actions in the opening phase.

 

Chess960 Opening Principles #2: Mobilize your forces in the minimum time!

Explanation: Before the start of the chess battle, the opponents possess armies completely identical in strength, initially positioned way back in the rear. From the very first move, the hostilities are opened. From then on, both sides strive to mobilize the pieces from their starting squares as fast as possible. Whoever brings his forces into the fray more quickly and expediently can count on seizing favourable posts in the centre and holding the initiative.

But how are your pieces to be mobilized within the tightest schedule? There can only be one answer: by spending time or tempi in the most strictly economical way. Each move must pursue the aim of developing the pieces or fighting for the centre. A move that fulfils both these tasks is especially valuable.

  • Don't move the same piece twice in the opening, but use the time to mobilize a different piece.
  • Don't waste time on useless moves with the flank pawns (a and h pawns).
  • Don't bring your queen out prematurely; then your opponent won't be able to mobilize his forces with tempo by attacking it.
  • Don't undertake any hasty unprepared attacks with one or two pieces, since your opponent will easily repel them at the same time as continuing to mobilize his own forces; you will risk falling hopelessly behind in development.