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Buffing/polishing scuffed plastic pieces

  • #21

    Finally found time to pop top on the Renaissance Wax and give these pieces some attention.  The results were remarkable.  Pieces turned out beautifully. Not only are the scuff marks are all gone the pieces now sparkle with life.  Thanks again for sharing with us this wonderful restorative.

     

    Some before and after photos (don't really do the set justice). 

     

    Before:

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    After:

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  • #22

    be careful if taking this set to a tournament. I know i would personally refuse to play with a red set,although some people might not mind

    goommba88

  • #23

    Thanks for the heads up goommba88. Was aware that these pieces would likely not fly at tournaments when I ordered them, which is fine as though they will be used regularly for online games and study sessions they'll not leave the house.   Have a rosewood set for tournament play.

     

    An additional note on these particular pieces, it seems that they are red plastic all way through.  It's the ball on top of the crown of the queens (and perhaps the bishops also) that is a red plastic coating over black plastic as can be seen on one of the extra queens.  Other queens are fine.   Couple more shots:

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    Lastly, even though did my best with lighting and angles the red pieces still appear lighter than they actually are in most of the photos (they're nearly blood red) and again, they just don't do the pieces justice.  This Renaissance Wax treatment has turned nice, playable pieces into a handsome set indeed.  Look forward to first win with red!

  • #24

    Was able to get some better photos of the pieces:

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  • #25

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  • #26

    and last one. 

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    Nice little set, spent a couple hours polishing to get them to look like this but it was worth it.  

  • #27
    goommba88 wrote:

    be careful if taking this set to a tournament. I know i would personally refuse to play with a red set,although some people might not mind

    goommba88

    Were I the tournament director, I'd deny your appeal and allow the set.

  • #28
    cgrau wrote:
    goommba88 wrote:

    be careful if taking this set to a tournament. I know i would personally refuse to play with a red set,although some people might not mind

    goommba88

    Were I the tournament director, I'd deny your appeal and allow the set.

    Mr. Grau 2 years ago I had purchased this set in blue and natural and red and ivory colors. The picture you see is the result of first inspection when they arrived (The defective and loose weight pieces are all lined up on the side of the board). I had purchased the two sets with storage bags for $26.00 but they had many drawbacks. Some pieces were damaged and more that half from both sets had loose weights (This may have reflected in the low pricing). I had requested replacements and they arrived but some still had loose weights but no physical defects or deformities. I bought them to use as "banger" sets so I didn't mind if they got beat up while playing outdoors in parks or coffee shops where some opponents tend to move pieces as if they were dominos on the board. My question to you is to obtain such a great polished shine to the pieces is it wise to use an inexpensive motorized bench grinder with a soft buffer wheel attachment for this purpose, your thoughts? Thank you kindly...Jorge.

     

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  • #29
    For a change of scenery recently purchased these "Traditional Staunton"  pieces from Wholesale Chess in red and ivory and have been quite enjoying them.  As expected some of the red pieces have scuff marks  (they warn customers about this, something about the manufacturing process for the red and blue pieces) the marks are pretty faint and not such a big deal as the set is useable fresh out of the box."
     
     
     
     
     

     If I may ask how did you polish your pieces by hand or by using a motorized buffing wheel attachment? I have the same set as you do and have a can of minwax wood finishing paste. Is this suitable to polish plastic as well?

     
     
     
     
     
     
     

     

  • #30
    salcero1 wrote:
    cgrau wrote:
    goommba88 wrote:

    be careful if taking this set to a tournament. I know i would personally refuse to play with a red set,although some people might not mind

    goommba88

    Were I the tournament director, I'd deny your appeal and allow the set.

    Mr. Grau 2 years ago I had purchased this set in blue and natural and red and ivory colors. The picture you see is the result of first inspection when they arrived (The defective and loose weight pieces are all lined up on the side of the board). I had purchased the two sets with storage bags for $26.00 but they had many drawbacks. Some pieces were damaged and more that half from both sets had loose weights (This may have reflected in the low pricing). I had requested replacements and they arrived but some still had loose weights but no physical defects or deformities. I bought them to use as "banger" sets so I didn't mind if they got beat up while playing outdoors in parks or coffee shops where some opponents tend to move pieces as if they were dominos on the board. My question to you is to obtain such a great polished shine to the pieces is it wise to use an inexpensive motorized bench grinder with a soft buffer wheel attachment for this purpose, your thoughts? Thank you kindly...Jorge.

     

     

    Hi Jorge,

    Please call me Chuck. I do all my polishing by hand using Renaissance Wax and either a cotton cloth or paper towel. Good luck!

  • #31

    Thanks Chuck I will try the Renaissance wax with an old discarded T-shirt that has seen better days. I  wasn't too successful with the Minwax finishing paste wax as you can see with these 2 photos. BTW how much Renaissance wax do I apply to the pieces, a very thin film and let dry for 30 minutes then buff it to polished shine? I think my mistake was that I had applied too much and it was awfully tough to remove once dried. There are still little smudges of dried paste wax between the small details of the knights and rooks as well as some of the bases of the pieces.  nullnull

  • #32
    salcero1 wrote:

    Thanks Chuck I will try the Renaissance wax with an old discarded T-shirt that has seen better days. I  wasn't too successful with the Minwax finishing paste wax as you can see with these 2 photos. BTW how much Renaissance wax do I apply to the pieces, a very thin film and let dry for 30 minutes then buff it to polished shine? I think my mistake was that I had applied too much and it was awfully tough to remove once dried. There are still little smudges of dried paste wax between the small details of the knights and rooks as well as some of the bases of the pieces.  

    I do tend to apply generous amounts, and often use a soft toothbrush for the detail areas.  You don't have to wait that long. I apply to a few pieces, then buff off, then repeat with the next couple pieces, and so on.

  • #33

    Ok I'll try the quicker application and buffing method. I do want to obtain a inexpensive bench grinder though with a soft material buffer polishing wheel. My fingers tend to stiffen up after manipulating such small items for a period of time. The bench grinder would eliminate that problem Much Thanks Chuck!

  • #34

    Renaissance wax is great stuff for plastic pieces - as Chuck has shown us through his ability to capture chess pieces.  =)

    Used a similar process to the one he described, applying generous amounts to each piece.  I did one piece at a time while watching some chess video or other. Maybee you could try something like that, doing just a few pieces at a time/session? The 32 pieces get done before you know it.  Happy buffing and good banging battles.  Let us know how they hold up to it.

  • #35
    salcero1 wrote:

    Ok I'll try the quicker application and buffing method. I do want to obtain a inexpensive bench grinder though with a soft material buffer polishing wheel. My fingers tend to stiffen up after manipulating such small items for a period of time. The bench grinder would eliminate that problem Much Thanks Chuck!

    You're very welcome.

  • #36
    keysquareskerfuffle wrote:

    Renaissance wax is great stuff for plastic pieces - as Chuck has shown us through his ability to capture chess pieces.  =)

    Used a similar process to the one he described, applying generous amounts to each piece.  I did one piece at a time while watching some chess video or other. Maybee you could try something like that, doing just a few pieces at a time/session? The 32 pieces get done before you know it.  Happy buffing and good banging battles.  Let us know how they hold up to it.

    Yeah, but I always let them go!

  • #37
    cgrau wrote:
    keysquareskerfuffle wrote:

    Renaissance wax is great stuff for plastic pieces - as Chuck has shown us through his ability to capture chess pieces.  =)

    Used a similar process to the one he described, applying generous amounts to each piece.  I did one piece at a time while watching some chess video or other. Maybee you could try something like that, doing just a few pieces at a time/session? The 32 pieces get done before you know it.  Happy buffing and good banging battles.  Let us know how they hold up to it.

    Yeah, but I always let them go!

    null

    Under promotion can be good policy sometimes. =)

  • #38

    I tried the Renaissance wax this morning on just a few red pieces of this set and it does make a bit of a difference. What I've concluded in my assessment is that the Renaissance removes scratches much better than the minwax finishing paste for wood. The finished polished few are in the photos, with the bishop and rook shot the paste wax polish is on the left, renaissance on right. Same in the second shot with the queens, paste left, renaissance right. King came out well with the Renaissance too. I'll stick with the Renaissance wax, it's much easier to apply and remove with buffing. Paste wax is a bear to buff and remove if you wait longer than 10 minutes to dry. Thanks for the advice Chuck and keysquareskerfuffle.nullnull

  • #39

    wow tough crowd. I like that shade of red. I've used Renaissance wax on wooden pieces fresh from India and it really made a difference. Sometimes there is still dust and stuff and the wax "finishes" them and takes that dry appearance away.

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