Looking for free coach

Gatornut321
Hi there, I recently picked up chess and I'm looking to improve my game. I know the basics but that's about it.
notmtwain
Gatornut321 wrote:
Hi there, I recently picked up chess and I'm looking to improve my game. I know the basics but that's about it.

That's what Chess Mentor is, a free coach. (Chess Mentor is just the original name for the interactive lessons here.)

 

Gatornut321

I like the lessons but I think or maybe I'm wrong that I could learn better from an actual person during an actual game.

TacticWiz

I can help you just leave me a message.

MyMethod

Free mentors are chess books. But you will have a very hard time which one to read from the oceans of chess books.

MyMethod

Not totally free btw. You need to buy. At least it is not as expensive as $25 per hour.

PremierChess64

You're not going to get any good coach for free. You could like www.facebook.com/premierchess for free educational content daily though. 

santiagomagno15

I give a free lesson if you want, just message me

SmokeJS
My guess is that like most things in life you get what you pay for. Free is often expensive in other ways.
ed1975

There's no such thing as a free lunch?

IMBacon
Gatornut321 wrote:
Hi there, I recently picked up chess and I'm looking to improve my game. I know the basics but that's about it.

Opening Principles:

1. Control the center squares – d4-e4-d5-e5

2. Develop your minor pieces toward the center – piece activity is the key

3. Castle

4. Connect your rooks

Tactics...tactics...tactics...

 

Pre Move Checklist:

1. Make sure all your pieces are safe. 

2. Look for forcing move: Checks, captures, threats. You want to look at ALL forcing moves (even the bad ones) this will force you look at, and see the entire board. 

3. If there are no forcing moves, you then want to remove any of your opponent’s pieces from your side of the board. 

4. If your opponent doesn’t have any of his pieces on your side of the board, then you want to improve the position of your least active piece. 

5. After each move by your opponent, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?"

 

Middlegame Planning:

1. Expand your position:

a. Gain more space.

b. Improve the position of your pieces.

2. Decide on what side of the board to play.

a. Queenside: a-c files.

b. Center: d-e files.

c. Kingside: f-h files.

Compare, space, material, and weakness(es)

Play where you have the advantage.

3. DO NOT HURRY.  Regroup your pieces, and be patient.