Defensive opening for a Gambit player

thaynethomas

So I tend to play gambits Elephant, Danish, on occasion King's or Queen's.
But the issue is I can play a fair game when my opponent is willing to trade and fight me toe to toe, but when Solomon plays an opening that is more defensive say Rat for a non specific example I am caught off guard and almost always enter the mid game with poor positioning to try and crack a defense.
My question is what would be some good defensive openings for a gambit player like me or at least some e4 openings to deal with defensive openings.
Your Obedient
Thayne Thomas Keele

corum

There is no reason why you shouldn't continue playing the King's Gambit, for example. But after 1. e4 e5 2. f4 you have to be prepared for moves such as d6 and not just assume your opponent will accept your gambit. Study games that start 1. e4 e5 2. f4 d6. Use explorer on chess.com. For example, the most popular continuations in explorer are Nf3 and Nc3 so try those moves. There is a GM on chess.com that has a whole range of videos about playing the King's Gambit and he covers lines such 1. e4 e5 2. f4 d6.

DeirdreSkye

 

     You want some good defensive openings for a gambit player like you or at least some e4 openings to deal with defensive openings.

I would like to help but I really have no idea what are you trying to say.        

thaynethomas

Forgive me I was asking for defensive openings that would suit the style of a player who likes gambits, so I can have something ready when my opponent dose not try and take the center.

Again forgive me for a fool I should have been clearer.

Your Obedient,

Thayne Thomas Keele

DeirdreSkye

I must say that I still understand nothing but I think I suspect what you want.

 You want something if your oponnet doesn't respond your 1.e4 with 1...e5?

If that is the case(if it's not not then I am clueless) , you are asking for something close to impossible.You want something against 1...e6 (French defense) , 1...c6 (Caro Kan) , 1...c5 (Sicilian) , 1...d6 (Pirc) , 1....g6(Modern) ,1...Nf6 (Alekhine's defense) and some minor ones like 1...d5 (Scandinavian) and 1...b6 (Owen's defense).

    There are  some easy ways to sidestep most of theory since your opponents will never play theory anyway until you start playing against 1700+ players.

    For example exchange variation followed by c4 can cover you in French and Caro Kan , 150 attack in Pirc and Modern , KIA against Sicilian  and common sense chess in the others but  you will need to study some example games.

   Another idea is KIA against all the main defenses and common sense against the rest.

I won't say more because I am not even sure I'm actually answering your question.If I am , you are asking for too much info in just one post(you can understand that already) but I was thinking of making a blog(it will need 3 or 4 long posts but I have most of the material ready) about it some time ago (easy repertoire with 1.e4) so I might do it(if I find time which is the main problem).

    Something I must say is that there are no "defensive" openings. It's a wrong term. There are defenses but no defensive openings. All openings have short term and long temr counter-attacking ideas. No opening has as a goal to be "defensive" , even the ones that surrender space and the centre. Some delay the counterattack more than others , some are more cramped than others but none is "defensive". 

thaynethomas

I am sorry for my stupidity, I should be more clear I merely wish for recommendations for defenses for when as you said white dose not come to the middle of the board or in the case that I am playing black a defense that I can set up should the need arise. Though i will of course look into your counsel I am sure there is a great deal to be learned studying it.
In short I was just hoping for recommendations of defensive openings that I could then study and perhaps employ. 
Again forgive my ineptitude I did not intend to confuse, and again thank you. 

Your Obedient,

Thayne Thomas Keele

DeirdreSkye

Man really , thank you for your politeness but I still can't figure out what you want and forgive my stupidity.

In post #5 I attempted to give an answer. I only needed to tell me if that was what you were looking for but you didn't.

      Can you reread it please , and be less polite and more specific because we both have only one lifetime and no resources for cryogenic preservation?

h4_explosive
DeirdreSkye wrote:

Can you reread it please , and be less polite and more specific because we both have only one lifetime and no resources for cryogenic preservation?

grin.png that was actually quite funny.

but seriously... OP is probably the most polite guy I've ever seen in this forum, but I have to say I don't understand his question that well either lol

 

I think you might want to have a look at the Pirc defense as black thaynethomas, it's very solid but also creates imbalances so the games can be quite exciting still. but as DeirdreSkye said, you cannot expect to have one opening against every response by your opponent, you just have to adapt to your opponent. If your opponent plays a move you are not prepared for, just stick to opening principles (develope your pieces etc etc) and you should be fine at your level happy.png

have a nice day!

thaynethomas

Ok I will try, all I hoped for was a recommendation on a few openings that do not rely on my opponent to preform a specific reaction, if my opponent doesn't advance past there 3rd rank I end up a little lost and confused. 

I am sorry for all the fuss. I will look into Pirc. Thank you

BobbyTalparov

Are you looking for white opening recommendations or black opening recommendations? The phrasing is rather confusing.

thaynethomas

Well it seems the only thing that is clear is that I have no career in writing.

But Bobby either would be good, I will admit that all I was expecting was a few curt try blank openings. I am shocked to get more than that in response.

DeirdSkye sorry to have caused you such stress that was never my intent.

Kmatta

I think he plays hypermodern openings as Black and wants recommendations against more conservative approaches. Or he plays a lot of gambits, but wants an opening as Black that does not gambit. I don't know. Maybe one of these are right...

m_n0

I think what I'm understanding is that you want openings that you can play regardless of what your opponent does. Chess is all about reacting to what your opponent is doing, so such things don't tend to go so well. The closest thing to an answer to the question I think you're asking would be some sort of Stonewall set-up.

h4_explosive
thaynethomas wrote:

Ok I will try, all I hoped for was a recommendation on a few openings that do not rely on my opponent to preform a specific reaction, if my opponent doesn't advance past there 3rd rank I end up a little lost and confused. 

I am sorry for all the fuss. I will look into Pirc. Thank you

ok now I understand grin.png yeah, so my recommendation was actually valid - the Pirc is playable against many 1. e4 replies. the hedgehog defense might also be worth looking into - it seems passive at first, but later on the games can heaten up. against 1. d4 the stonewall dutch might be an option.

and if you are playing white and your opponent is giving you all the space - just take the space and develope your pieces, get castled and attack him wink.png

thaynethomas

Hi, this is Thayne's wife, he asked me to translate His comments into English.

Essentially Thayne is having the issue of

Thayne: Opens with gambit

Opponent: Ignores gambit and develops defense instead

Thayne: has no idea what to do

I am not a chess player, so hopefully that's at least semi-helpful to you people.

Sincerely the fun one

The Fun One

P.S. From Thayne: H4 Explosive, I will look into pirc and hedgehog, thank you

DeirdreSkye
thaynethomas wrote:

Hi, this is Thayne's wife, he asked me to translate His comments into English.

Essentially Thayne is having the issue of

Thayne: Opens with gambit

Opponent: Ignores gambit and develops defense instead

Thayne: has no idea what to do

I am not a chess player, so hopefully that's at least semi-helpful to you people.

Sincerely the fun one

The Fun One

P.S. From Thayne: H4 Explosive, I will look into pirc and hedgehog, thank you

   Although not a chesplayer you explained it better than Thayne. I tried to answer in post #5 but I had no type of meanigful feedback from him.

    It is difficult to show him what to play against every Black defense because they are many(you will see a short list in post #5).

In his rating none of his opponents will play theory and games are decided by blunders not because of a theoretical edge in the opening .It will be better for him to play common sense chess and not spend time learning lines that don't matter anyway.

    I will show some examples:

 

White's strategy is simple , release the tension in the centre and develops normally. Nb1 is needed to d2 to support Nf3 and release the queen from guarding Nf3 , and c3 pawn protects d4.

    Same thing against Caro Kan works.

Nothing difficult but understanding the reasoning of the moves is important.

Again , nothing difficult , just common sense chess.

These are some general examples that can serve him well in most of the cases. If he understands the reasons behind the moves he will be able to play against anything else.

     If he doesn't understand , he can ask questions.

 

BobbyTalparov
thaynethomas wrote:

Hi, this is Thayne's wife, he asked me to translate His comments into English.

Essentially Thayne is having the issue of

Thayne: Opens with gambit

Opponent: Ignores gambit and develops defense instead

Thayne: has no idea what to do

I am not a chess player, so hopefully that's at least semi-helpful to you people.

Sincerely the fun one

The Fun One

P.S. From Thayne: H4 Explosive, I will look into pirc and hedgehog, thank you

That being the case ...

 

Take the King's Gambit, for example.  White must be prepared for 2 replies:  black accepts the gambit (exf4), or black declines the gambit (usually d6, but there are other approaches).  If he only knows what to do when black accepts the gambit, he is missing out on half of his preparation.

 

The following diagram does not go very deep, but is meant to demonstrate the moves white should be prepared to handle when playing the King's Gambit.  Every move except exf4 is a King's Gambit Declined (KGD) line.  The main purpose of most gambits is to gain time for rapid development combined with open diagonals/files.  If your opponent declines the gambit, you should keep going with basic opening principles (e.g. develop pieces, pressure or occupy the center, get your king to safety)

 

 

kindaspongey
thaynethomas wrote:

... all I hoped for was a recommendation on a few openings that do not rely on my opponent to preform a specific reaction, ...

XXX

XXX

"One particular approach to opening repertoire management is the use of universal systems, ... The use of such systems can enable a player to reduce the amount of opening theory he needs to study, and to reach positions of a type he is familiar with and enjoys playing. It is to the pros and cons of this approach that we now turn. ... it is rather more difficult for Black to adopt a universal system, ... The most popular one ... I will discuss in the next section. ... I refer to the King's Indian/Pirc/Modern complex. These lines are characterized by a kingside fianchetto, with such moves as ...g6, ...Bg7, ....d6, ...Nf6, etc. ... The lack of early central contact ... means that there is little chance of violent early contact knocking the player out of his preferred scheme. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2003)

"... If you choose the Pirc against 1 e4, it makes sense to consider the King's Indian against 1 d4. This is more flexible and will give you additional options later. ..." - GM John Nunn (2006)

If I remember correctly, GM Seirawan suggested this sort of thing in Winning Chess Openings.
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627132508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen173.pdf
Also discussed in A Practical Black Repertoire with Nf6, g6, d6
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7655.pdf
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7632.pdf

Anumakaar

It sounds as if you don’t know, and ought to know, the King’s Gambit Declined.

There are chapters on “sidelines” and “rare lines” in John Shaw’s book on the king’s gambit (2013).