Easiest opening to learn for beginners ..

  • #101

    And all of this misses my original point ... to wit, one of the easiest openings for a RAW BEGINNER to learn ... is the Colle. 

  • #102

    And I have played the King's Gambit myself ... hundreds of times in blitz. And I know that occasionally I have lost to a player 1000 points below me ... when things go wrong in a KG, it gets nasty, really quick. 

  • #103

    You simply don't teach openings to your students- period and fullstop.

    I have coached a few GM's, but I never bothered to show them openings.

    Just shaping up their playing style, and learning them how to deal with complex strategical and tactical setups. They formed their opening repertoire themselves, AFTER they have achieved a personal playing style.

  • #104

    sign me up!!!

  • #105

    I started with this one:



  • #106

    That, the Italian Game, is what most beginners should play. It simply develops pieces, allows them to castle, and have a good game.

  • #107

    This is the well-known inaccuracy which allows 4...Nxe4 with a good game for Black- although Black's best line is not the one most authorities suggest.

  • #108
    pfren wrote:

    This is the well-known inaccuracy which allows 4...Nxe4 with a good game for Black- although Black's best line is not the one most authorities suggest.

    Yeah, true! But we're talking about beginners. After 5.O-O Nxc3 6.dxc3 Bc5? 7.Ng5 O-O? 8.Qh5 and possibilities for quick mate.

  • #109
    pfren wrote:

    You simply don't teach openings to your students- period and fullstop.

    I have coached a few GM's, but I never bothered to show them openings.

    Just shaping up their playing style, and learning them how to deal with complex strategical and tactical setups. They formed their opening repertoire themselves, AFTER they have achieved a personal playing style.

    I can't see you letting a raw beginner have opening disaster after opening disaster ... and you would never intervene and offer advice? (I find that one hard to even believe.) I certainly would not call it coaching.

    You wanna find out what real coaching is, go out and WATCH/OBSERVE what they do. No facet of the game (any game, football, baseball, etc) is left out. From first steps, to dealing with an advanced player, really good coaches seem to be able to do it all. 

    I think that chess coaching should be no different. 

  • #110

    No, I do not offer any opening courses to newbies. I just teach them playing chess, not memorizing variations.

    The ones that like the game and have interest in it, can sit down and study openings by themselves. My only advice is picking up something SIMPLE and ACTIVE, which means: certainly not the Colle.

  • #111
    alexlaw wrote:

    @National Master

    Although you have much more coaching experience (30 years!), I have to disagree. I think your question needs to be reworded as: 'which opening(s) can beginners last longest against pros, rather than 'easiest opening to learn for beginners'.

    You have your thoughts, I have mine. 

    Probably another easy opening to learn is the Giuoco Piano ... as you develop pieces simply, to their natural squares. But if you play that way, they have to have one line for the French, one line for the Sicilian, one line for the Caro-Kann, on line for the Modern, one line for the Alekhine's Defense, etc. 

    Whereas - with the Colle - you teach them the FUNDAMENTALS of chess. (Opening principles.) (The first link is to an entire website dedicated to teaching the openings ... the second one is an explanation of my own personal system in chess. It is unique, and differs from both what most Americans teach and the "Russian School of Chess.") 

    It sounds like - to me - that you have very little experience actually taking young charges to a tournament, where I have done it more times than I can count. 

    One last time - my article was aimed at the raw beginner. I have actually set down and taught someone the moves ... more times than I can recall. And thanks to my own "Beginner's Chess Course," (which Yahoo credited as being one of the most popular downloads in all of GeoCities, before GC closed!); I have taught countless others to play chess, via the Internet. 

  • #112
    Bankwell wrote:

    What moron taught you fools business.


    Unless I forget something big, you didn't teach me anything.

  • #113

    Excellent post Bankwell.

  • #114

    Bankwell - obviously - came in here to sound off and look foolish, in this regard, he succeeded magnificently. 

  • #115
    FLchessplayer wrote:

    Bankwell - obviously - came in here to sound off and look foolish, in this regard, he succeeded magnificently. 

    No, I just don't think people got the intent of his post.

  • #116

    I suspect it's BS, but it's a tidy little piece of advertising.

    Business rule #1, there's always profit in being there to provide water to the thirsty crowd.

  • #117

    I'm not saying I'm definitely right here, and I'm open to other ideas. Plus I only coach juniors and don't have any experience with novice adults. But...

    I find from experience that the best approach is to allow them to choose their own openings (within reason, if they play something completely daft I would suggest them changing it) and then teach them to play those chosen openings well.

    Rationale: if they personally like their opening, then they are more likely to want to learn it, and will pay more attention to improving. If they feel the opening is imposed on them, they are more likely to just go through the motions of pretending to learn it, whilst actually all they are doing is memorising sequences of moves without trying to understand what's actually going on.

  • #118

    Like learning the guitar...

  • #119

    IMO, I don't think that is the right method.The reason is that before you learn to play, let's say Dutch, you have first to learn to play Queen's Gambit.If you don't , you will have a huge gap in your education that eventually will kick in.

       A junior chessplayer is like a kid.If you want him to be "strong" you have to "feed" him correctly and not let him "eat" what he likes.Later when he can judge  , he can decide about his "food" but at his first steps he has to be guided closely because the point is not to understand an opening.The point is to understand chess, that is what many forget(I'm talking generally).

  • #120
    FLchessplayer wrote:

    There are quite a few broken links in the above lesson ... if I get enough demand, I will post the corrected links here. 

    If there are broken links, then post it, even if there isn't a huge demand.

    I know I would like it.

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