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Old Benoni as the best anti-d4

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Ethan_Brollier

Oh. Sorry, yeah, correct line is 3. Nc3 d6 4. e4 g6 5. Nf3 Bg7 6. Bb5+.

Sorry for the confusion.

Looking through those lines again, I actually tend to prefer 6. Bc4 or 6. a4, but 6. Bb5 is thematic and solid enough.

Mazetoskylo

The Benoni strucure makes sense as Black only if white's pawn is at c4 already- else that square is a great place either for the Bf1, or the Ng1. Black isn't lost or something close to that, but he certainly has an unplesant position to defend.

Luskojs
i would of not called benoni an anti-d4 response. Tbh , d5 give’s white all space.
As an d4-player. this is not really a threat.
ibrust

Just speaking from experience I always feel like I get a good opening position against the Benoni... and I just know the basic ideas of the opening, I haven't even studied the lines. I think Benoni players have to try far harder than their opponents to even equalize. For the most part whites moves follow the same pattern and can be figured out OTB... I know it's unusual, but you always have to ask whether the surprise you get is actually paying off and worth compromising your position. Because at some point the game complexity is such that neither player knows the position, at that point you just want a fundamentally sound position over a surprising but compromised position. 
The only real reason to play the Old Benoni, IMO, would just be to learn the lines and then move on.
I do like the benko but I would probably not choose to enter it via the Old Benoni.

Kaon_497

Playing the old Ben Kenobi. I think c5 by itself can be good at the club level, in some blitz game in case the other player doesn’t know what they are doing. I haven’t really faced this as white, but according to memory white should play d5 and probably f4 at some point, and white should be better off.

ThrillerFan
Jopek9 wrote:
I know a lot of people love playing Modern Benoni (1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5) against d4 but the problem with this opening is that this is very easy for white to avoid. Plus it leaves very unpleasant d6 weakness for the rest of the game. Meanwhile Old Benoni (1. d4 c5) avoids all of theory and takes white by surprise. The only good reaction after c5 is d5. Every other move equalizes or gives advantage to black. Then you postpone e6 break as long as it will fit you. Even if you like particularly Modern Benoni structure then you can easily transpose as the best continuation for white is 1. d4 c5 2. d5 Nf6 3. c4 and you can choose if you go for Benko gambit, Modern Benoni, Snake or Czech. The position is very pleasant because you can play it either positionally or tactically. Still it won't be this effective at master level or very good advanced. I greatly recommend it for e4 players because after you end your opening you'll have at least 10 minutes advantage in classical chess or 1 minute in rapid or 30 seconds in blitz with your opponent flabbergasted. If anybody wonders why Nc3 isn't better in the 3rd move - that's because you don't cement your center and make b5 break easier, giving even easier play for black that almost always has the same moves. It's almost a system! c5 Nf6 g6 Bg7 d6 Nbd7/Na6 and you go either for e6 or b5 break. What are your thoughts about Old Benoni defense? Is it annoying, bad or you jusy literally dont't care?

There is so much wrong with this.

1.d4 c5?! 2.d5! Nf6 3.Nc3! Does not make ...b5 easier to play for Black. The moment Black plays ...a6, white can take the positional approach with a4, or depending on the line by Black, White can get a raging attack down the middle. It winds up either a Schmid Benoni or Half Benoni or Closed Benoni or Snake Benoni, all of which are good for White.

I would typically play a4 and take the positional approach with e4, Be2, Nf3, O-O, and then Nf3-d2-c4, assuming Black played ...d6 and not ...Bd6, which is far worse (Snake Benoni).

It is important to play Be2 Before Nf3 to avoid Black from trading his LSB for the Knight. You'd rather trade Bishops. So by developing the Bishop first, after Nf3, ...Bg4 can be answered with Nd2.

Sharp2Axe

Personally, untill 2300ish FIDE, Benko is best response against d4 c4. It is very practical, and you learn a lot from it (How to play with active pieces, down a pawn, etc.)

After that, KID is a very good choice against d4 c4 setups.

My experience and opinion.

ibrust

How is it your experience though if you're not 2300? 
Benko is very cool though.

Sharp2Axe
ibrust wrote:

How is it your experience though if you're not 2300? 
Benko is very cool though.

I have a friend who used it untill then.

But I can advocate that at 2000 FIDE elo it also starts to diminish in strength as it is hard to get winning chances.

Jopek9
ThrillerFan napisał:
Jopek9 wrote:
I know a lot of people love playing Modern Benoni (1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5) against d4 but the problem with this opening is that this is very easy for white to avoid. Plus it leaves very unpleasant d6 weakness for the rest of the game. Meanwhile Old Benoni (1. d4 c5) avoids all of theory and takes white by surprise. The only good reaction after c5 is d5. Every other move equalizes or gives advantage to black. Then you postpone e6 break as long as it will fit you. Even if you like particularly Modern Benoni structure then you can easily transpose as the best continuation for white is 1. d4 c5 2. d5 Nf6 3. c4 and you can choose if you go for Benko gambit, Modern Benoni, Snake or Czech. The position is very pleasant because you can play it either positionally or tactically. Still it won't be this effective at master level or very good advanced. I greatly recommend it for e4 players because after you end your opening you'll have at least 10 minutes advantage in classical chess or 1 minute in rapid or 30 seconds in blitz with your opponent flabbergasted. If anybody wonders why Nc3 isn't better in the 3rd move - that's because you don't cement your center and make b5 break easier, giving even easier play for black that almost always has the same moves. It's almost a system! c5 Nf6 g6 Bg7 d6 Nbd7/Na6 and you go either for e6 or b5 break. What are your thoughts about Old Benoni defense? Is it annoying, bad or you jusy literally dont't care?

There is so much wrong with this.

1.d4 c5?! 2.d5! Nf6 3.Nc3! Does not make ...b5 easier to play for Black. The moment Black plays ...a6, white can take the positional approach with a4, or depending on the line by Black, White can get a raging attack down the middle. It winds up either a Schmid Benoni or Half Benoni or Closed Benoni or Snake Benoni, all of which are good for White.

I would typically play a4 and take the positional approach with e4, Be2, Nf3, O-O, and then Nf3-d2-c4, assuming Black played ...d6 and not ...Bd6, which is far worse (Snake Benoni).

It is important to play Be2 Before Nf3 to avoid Black from trading his LSB for the Knight. You'd rather trade Bishops. So by developing the Bishop first, after Nf3, ...Bg4 can be answered with Nd2.

I mean a4 isn't so hard to meet. It is still making b4 square available and even after a5 push it's either weak or we can ingore it and play with pieces. Besides you can always go for e6 because d5 isn't supported by c4 pawn. And that isn't my personal belief but my coach's, a Fide Master.