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St. George's Defense is OK!

  • #21
    BrianCh wrote:

    Have you read them?

    Indeed I have read them both. I have had both but now I only retain the last volume "The New St. George". I can actually do you one better I also have "The Polish Defense" by Thomas Kapitaniak which has you should know is a close relative of the St.George.

    The reason I asked if any of the posters have read either volumes of the St.George (or Baker's Defence) is there are people passing judging on 1...a6 (or as you so rightly point out 1...e6 & 2...a6) based soley on dogmatic principles without actually knowing what the long term point of 1...a6 is as Basman and others have played it.

    To say that 1...a6 is with out a point is simply wrong. Basman on page 1 of the above mentioned book points that a6 and b5 effect the centre squares by safeguarding the position of a Black Knight arriving at d5 by restraining the advance c4 by White. Basman then goes further with this logic by suggesting that under his prefered move order that after 1.e4 e6 2.d4 a6 that 3.c4! is a logical progression, after all Black wants d5. Basman then suggest the sacrifice 3...b5 after which positions simular to Owen's Defence occur should White accept the sac. I am not going into lines ad infinitum, buy the book or books or if you are really cheap I have seen pdf's on line.

    One final thing, the often repeated Miles v Karpov game.

     Can anyone tell me what is wrong with     5.e5 Nd5 6.Ng5!

     Hadron.


     

  • #22

    ok, it´s playable, but   white should play  3. c3!!

    what is the idea behind the move a6?  I´ts play b5 of course.  

     If you hold a set up b2-c3-d4-e4   and then you play  a4! i think you are  ok with white pieces ,  this is very classic in modern defense when the white player plays  Nc3 and Black plays a6!.  So here is the same , but white didn´t play yet the move Nc3.   The plan  a6-b5 is little effective if the white plays this set-up . 


     



  • #23
    JohnnyKGB wrote:

    ok, it´s playable, but   white should play  3. c3!!

    what is the idea behind the move a6?  I´ts play b5 of course.  

     If you hold a set up b2-c3-d4-e4   and then you play  a4! i think you are  ok with white pieces ,  this is very classic in modern defense when the white player plays  Nc3 and Black plays a6!.  So here is the same , but white didn´t play yet the move Nc3.   The plan  a6-b5 is little effective if the white plays this set-up .

    Well, maybe yes maybe no. The issue as I see it with your analysis is it possibly presupposes a rigid move order.

    You are right though, to a degree, that the point of a6 is to play b5 ( as I mentioned earlier to restrain the pawn advance c2-c4) but given you have rather obviously set out the intention of your plan by playing 3.c3!? (and with respect to you giving such a simple move 2 excalamation marks is somewhat excessive) that 3...Bb7 is not altogether precise and maybe 3...e6 is needed first to contest the queenside dark squares. Of course then 4.Nd2 makes less sense. If memory serves Basman won a game against this very formation but from a different move order (1.e4 a6 2.d4 e6 3.c3 b5)

    Then again if you use that move order and go down your suggested try of 3.c3, there are other tries such as 1.e4 a6 2.d4 e6 3.c3 d5 is one and 1.e4 a6 2.d4 e6 3.c3 c5

    I am not saying you are wrong or right but pointing out that if one is going to try and play Basmany chess, you can not be inflexible with your ideas or as you point out, one could end up being fornicated at great rate of knots.

  • #24

    After 5. a4 instead of c5, Black can play 5. ... bxa4 then play 6. ... c5. Black won't be a pawn down and can continue with his development.

  • #25

    I've read Basman's book on the opening and played it a couple of times, once against d4 and once against e4.

    I won both but the game I played against e4 was fantastic. I'm generally a 1470 to 1530 rated player and my opponent was 1649, he had a large centre but I found the st George's countered it easily with the powerful bishop on b7 that proved difficult to exchange. In a simplified ending I ended up a pawn up with the bishop against knight in both my games which was simply dominating. It happened in the Miles-Karpov game and is winning for black. If you can play the opening and simplify down to a bishop against knight ending you should have a won/equal position. Unless your opponent is an attacking legend or you forget how the pieces move I think it is difficult to lose when you deploy this opening against e4. It works against d4 but makes for a longer struggle in which White could prevent black from reaching the desired ending, and, succeeding in doing so, the game will end in a draw. Thanks :)

  • #26

    There is one reason to play a6 at all as black. In the St. George Defense, white MUST attack. Otherwise his advantage will disappear.

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