The Black Lion defenses

AndyJessop
TitanCG wrote:

I don't know about any refutation but the only time you don't get to use the setup is when White wants an endgame.

 

I believe you should play Nd7 before e5 to avoid exchanging queens.

SuirenBoid
AndyJessop wrote:
TitanCG wrote:

I don't know about any refutation but the only time you don't get to use the setup is when White wants an endgame.

 

I believe you should play Nd7 before e5 to avoid exchanging queens.

Nope, I believe that runs into f4 and the exchange of queens is not to be feared at all, not a way for white to play for advantage at all!

GWTR
SuirenBoid wrote:
AndyJessop wrote:
TitanCG wrote:

I don't know about any refutation but the only time you don't get to use the setup is when White wants an endgame.

 

I believe you should play Nd7 before e5 to avoid exchanging queens.

Nope, I believe that runs into f4 and the exchange of queens is not to be feared at all, not a way for white to play for advantage at all!

GM Simon Williams reviews this game on his deeee veeeee deeee:

 

1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 Nbd7 4.f4 e5 5.Nf3 exd4 6.Qxd4 c6 7.Be3 d5 8.e5 Ng4 (Karjakin,S - Nepomniachtchi,I)

 

Black Lion DVD

kindaspongey

The Black Lion, 2nd Edition by Jerry van Rekom & Leo Jansen (2009)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627122350/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen123.pdf
A Cunning Chess Opening for Black by Sergey Kasparov (2015)
http://www.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Cunning-Chess-Opening-for-Black-A-76p3899.htm
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9008.pdf

ServiceMyBishop
TitanCG wrote:

I don't know about any refutation but the only time you don't get to use the setup is when White wants an endgame.

 



actually that is avoided with Nd7

 

jpen1

BUT THIS IS HANHAM PHILIDOR?!

GWTR

What do you think about playing 5 ...h6 in response to 5. Bc4 in the main line?

 

Black is going to play h6 anyway, and this seems to avoid the Lion's Roar (and similar lines).

TheEinari

I've been watching IM John Bartholomew's videos and he had a nice rule of thumb (I believe he borrowed it but none the less): Don't play openings named after animals.

Lyudmil_Tsvetkov

The Hanham is very good, under specific circumstances.

In the order of moves presented, 3. Bd3 is much stronger than 3. Nc3, and after 3...e5 4. d5, we get
here:

 

White has big advantage:

- spatial central advantage

- Nf6 blocks the f7 pawn

4...Na6 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. Bd7 Qd7 7. f3

4...Be7 5. c4, followed by Nc3, etc.

My theory is solving openings by the sheer power of patterns.