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  • #21
    bouncing_check wrote:

    "Blatt" is colloquial for a newspaper.

    It does sound as though the failure of the second mentioned nespaper was the cause of the failure of his health. It says "as publisher of the paper"; I think that if there had been no causal effect the author would have said "during" ("während") instead of "as" ("als"). It's arguable, but the feeling that comes across on reading it is that the failure of the paper was responsible for his physical collapse. (My qualifications: bilingual, author (mainly in German), living and working in Berlin for 30 years).

    Exactly. The feeling comes across but its not mentioned specifically.

    Edit to classify:I'd bet there was a causal effect.  

  • #22

    "He began his journalism career with the rapidly misfortunate financial newspaper Green Pages;  a breakdown of his health was brought on later, when he was publisher of Vienna General News.  [He was?] a broken man and after a loss of nearly half a million, the 21st October 1888, back where he started." 

    There seems to be a typographic error; the second sentence doesn't quite parse and is missing an initial capital.

  • #23

    The first newspaper very well could have been named "Green Leaves".  You are just speculating based on context, but you cannot positively rule out that the paper was named "Green Leaves" without personal knowledge.  It could have been a double entendre as well.

  • #24
    nartreb wrote:

    There seems to be a typographic error; the second sentence doesn't quite parse and is missing an initial capital.

    As I said above, it makes perfect sense if you substitute a comma for the full stop, which also explains the missing capital. And "back where he started" in your translation is incorrect; "zurücklegte" refers to the newspaper, not to himself, ie he gave it up.

  • #25

    Ignatz Kolisch?

  • #26

    That makes sense.  Missed a few posts while I was writing mine.  It's been a while since I read any German, never mind such a recondite nineteenth-century sentence structure, so I was slow.  I should have specified that I was unsure about those last two words especially.  

    John, the same word is used for both "leaf" and "page", true, but there's no real doubt about the translation here.  A pun is possible, though unlikely (it's a financial newspaper, not forestry), but even in that case you'd pick the meaning that would be first suggested in context.   

  • #27

    I understand that is what one may "pick" but the translation "Green Leaves" cannot be 100% ruled out without more facts.

    Perhaps the paper went bankrupt because it was named "Green Leaves" and nobody in the financial sector realized what it was.

  • #28

    You're just being stubborn.  Would the New York Times go bankrupt due to people assuming it's about multiplication?  That can't be ruled out 100% either.

  • #29

    You chess types are so narrow minded.

    Green Leaves has a nice ring to it.

    Let a hundred flowers blossom, my man.

  • #30

    Do you know the rest of that quote?

    When a hundred schools of thought contend, at least 99 of them are wrong.

  • #31
    nartreb wrote:

    You're just being stubborn.  Would the New York Times go bankrupt due to people assuming it's about multiplication?  That can't be ruled out 100% either.

    That was funny. Laughing

  • #32
    marcomarco13 wrote:

    "publicist" is not "public career" he is writing some ads, short texts, etc ...

    "Publicist" ist now written "Publizist" and means "journalist" in a broad sense (but only in print media).

  • #33
    batgirl wrote:

    Well, Google translates "Grüne Blätter" not as "Green Pages" but as "Green Leaves" which does sound a bit more poetic.  Of course, I'll just call it "Grüne Blätter."

    Can be both in german apparently.

    http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/Blatter

    And for entertainment and educational added value :

    Dutch language looks quite a bit like German.

    Here in Holland it is not very uncommon that german tourists start speaking in german to dutch folks, after which the dutch folks often talk back in german or in english or ... in dutch, and then the german tourists would usually continue talking in german Cool

    (Towers of Babylon ? First to the left, and then to the right at the end of the street)

    In dutch language "blad" is both leave from a tree, as well as magazine.

    "Club blad" is often referred to as the chess club magazine at a chess club in Holland.

  • #34
    achja wrote:
    batgirl wrote:

    Well, Google translates "Grüne Blätter" not as "Green Pages" but as "Green Leaves" which does sound a bit more poetic.  Of course, I'll just call it "Grüne Blätter."

    Can be both in german apparently.

    http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/Blatter

    And for entertainment and educational added value :

    Dutch language looks quite a bit like German.

    Here in Holland it is not very uncommon that german tourists start speaking in german to dutch folks, after which the dutch folks often talk back in german or in english or ... in dutch, and then the german tourists would usually continue talking in german

    (Towers of Babylon ? First to the left, and then to the right at the end of the street)

    In dutch language "blad" is both leave from a tree, as well as magazine.

    "Club blad" is often referred to as the chess club magazine at a chess club in Holland.

     

    :D soo true, the average german language capabilities are such a pitty 

  • #35

    Thanks everyone!  I think I've gotten the sense of the passage.

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