Checkmate pattern learning

Machariel

Hi all,

I went to study the various checkmate patterns with their exotic names. Am I really supposed to memorize all of these patterns and recognize them with their slight variations? If so, isn't it better to memorize them in packages of - say - three? Which ones should have priority?

Trexler3241

You don’t need to memorize the names.

Machariel
Trexler3241 wrote:

You don’t need to memorize the names.

LOL thanks for responding bro, but that wasn't the question:

Am I really supposed to memorize all of these patterns and recognize them with their slight variations?

Trexler3241

You can memorize them.

However you can learn them yourself...

DamonevicSmithlov

U should learn them, the patterns. Long ago, a very good chess teacher from Leningrad had me learn just basic mating patterns as a start. I wish I'd taken chess more seriously but it wasn't in me I guess. However, I've heard the same from players 2400-2700 too. It builds the basic foundation for all to follow.

Machariel

OK thanks. I'll prioritize.

Laskersnephew

Why not memorize them? You talk as if it were a vast intellectual labor, but it's really pretty easy. And very helpful

billy223

Find a copy of Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual and work through the examples a little at a time. I was told by a friend who is an IM in Oregon that you can learn the game backwards. What he meant was study endgame positions, then when you have some of these basic patterns understood, move into learning how to execute tactics and combinations and once you have found a playing style you are comfortable with, work on developing the types of openings you feel most comfortable with. The overall idea is while all games will have an ending, not all get to endgames. If you have a good grasp of the endings, you will have greater chances of converting games to wins, even positions that might be drawing or losing if you did not understand how to play then

Laskersnephew

 Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual is an extremely demanding book! It was written to help masters and candidate masters perfect their endgame sills and is wildly inappropriate for a near-beginner.

There are endgame books written specifically to help inexperienced players improve their endgames. Silman's Complete Endgame Course would be my first choice. 

But getting back to checkmating patterns, if the OP were to buy "How To Beat Your Dad at Chess" by Murray Chandler, and work his way systematically though it--twice! His ability to spot mating opportunities and execute them will increase enormously

billy223

Silman is actually really good. His books break down more advanced concepts pretty succinctly. Isn't there also a book called basic chess endings out there as well?

Laskersnephew

Dvoretsky's Endgame Manuel assumed that you have a complete grasp of all basic ending before you open it. It is a terrible choice for someone who started chess last week--or last year. And. of course, it contains none of the basic checkmating patterns that the OP was asking about

Machariel
Laskersnephew wrote:

Why not memorize them? You talk as if it were a vast intellectual labor, but it's really pretty easy. And very helpful

Very good point because I called the shot and did the available Chess.com Advanced Mating Patterns tutorial under the "attacking the king" section (advanced group) and it was actually all too easy. I thought indeed it would be hard labour. But it offered only three or four patterns and there isn't pattern training available. Or am I wrong? I hope so.

Laskersnephew

I haven't gotten around to taking the Advanced Mating Patterns course, but let me repeat my recommendation of "How to Beat Your Dad at Chess."  Despite the silly title, it's actually a very good introduction to all the most important mating ideas (more than three or four!) I think you would find it easy and fun to master

Machariel
Laskersnephew wrote:

I haven't gotten around to taking the Advanced Mating Patterns course, but let me repeat my recommendation of "How to Beat Your Dad at Chess."  Despite the silly title, it's actually a very good introduction to all the most important mating ideas (more than three or four!) I think you would find it easy and fun to master

The Advanced mating pattern course isn't worth in my opinion. Too light, and again no real drill is offered to cement it, other than the 5 or 6 "challenges" that come with each lesson. As for your title, I'm going for it.

Laskersnephew

Marchariel: You are a diamond member, so you have access t all the old courses as well as the new video-based ones. When you go to Lessons, on the right you can click on "Old Lessons," then select "Attacks" and the first two courses are both all about checkmate! I can guarantee you'll get an excellent workout! and when you're done with checkmates, click on "Tactics" and take all the Patrick Wolff tactics courses. You will be a dangerous man!

Machariel
Laskersnephew wrote:

Marchariel: You are a diamond member, so you have access t all the old courses as well as the new video-based ones. When you go to Lessons, on the right you can click on "Old Lessons," then select "Attacks" and the first two courses are both all about checkmate! I can guarantee you'll get an excellent workout! and when you're done with checkmates, click on "Tactics" and take all the Patrick Wolff tactics courses. You will be a dangerous man!

Looking good. I'm stuck at about level 1500 with tactics training. Endgames are killing me.

romannosejob

honestly, learning them (and their names) is helpful.

I don't know nearly all of them but I do find now when I see certain pieces in positions I can sort of think "looks like anastasia's mate." then you have an idea of what to do and, if it entails sac'ing your queen you can be confident it will get you the win.

I sacced my queen for a back rank mating pattern recently, like hell I was gonna do that if I hadn't played that tactic a dozen times before.

 

Yusupov's book has a lot about mating patterns, personally I found the book a bit dry so didn't go beyond chapter 3 but it might be a place to look. 1001 checkmates and the other website that shall not be named has a free practice section with the name and patterns of mates.

Laskersnephew

Yes, the names are a quick and easy way to remember the different mating patterns. It certainly can't hurt to know them

2015sakk
Machariel wrote:
Laskersnephew wrote:

Why not memorize them? You talk as if it were a vast intellectual labor, but it's really pretty easy. And very helpful

Very good point because I called the shot and did the available Chess.com Advanced Mating Patterns tutorial under the "attacking the king" section (advanced group) and it was actually all too easy. I thought indeed it would be hard labour. But it offered only three or four patterns and there isn't pattern training available. Or am I wrong? I hope so.

Hello!

If you want to learn basic mate patterns, I strongly recommend https://chesstempo.com/

It has the following mate patterns structured:

 

 

Not only they have a short but good description about them, but you can practice them, they also come in different rating levels. Very good for practicing. It's not free ofc. I dont know if it's an issue.

 

 

Machariel

Lot of help from all angles. Thank you so much everybody!