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Where to get good at endgames

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Lordpotato999

I most recently entered the intermediate range and realized a big flaw in my play. Most games at this level tend to go into drawish endgames more often where I am very bad. I was wondering if somebody knows any website/videos/books that could help me improve my chess endgames.

Thanks

SwimmerBill

My opinion only: I'd suggest starting with a thin book over basic endings. Averbakh has one but there are many others.

Beyond that the issue is 1. study an ending and 2. you want that study to 'stick'.

For me what works is, after I play and ending to study endings of that sort so it connects to what I've just seen. For example, I am now studying rook+2p vs rook + 1p since I just misplayed one. before that 2R vs Q endings.

(Some people can take a comprehensive book, start on page 1 and work thru it then they know it. I cannot.)

Lordpotato999

Thank you i’ll try studying ending I just played.

Amr-Khalied

:clap

tygxc

@1

"Most games at this level tend to go into drawish endgames."
++ The great players Capablanca, Rubinstein, Fischer, Carlsen won many drawn endgames.

"website" ++ The 7 men endgame table bases are very good, because they contain no errors

"videos" ++ Videos are passive learning.

"books" ++ There are many good endgame books, e.g. Fundamental Chess Endings - Müller & Lamprecht

RichColorado

This book will serve you thru your entire chess career . . .

bizonbiz
Lordpotato999 написал:

I most recently entered the intermediate range and realized a big flaw in my play. Most games at this level tend to go into drawish endgames more often where I am very bad. I was wondering if somebody knows any website/videos/books that could help me improve my chess endgames.

Thanks

Improving your skills in drawish endgames is indeed crucial at the intermediate level. For personalized and in-depth guidance, you might consider using domyessay.net, where experts can provide tailored essays or tutorials on advanced chess strategies, including specific endgame techniques, helping you enhance your gameplay effectively.

ripley12345

Silman's endgame course is the best book on endgames.

bizonbiz
SwimmerBill написал:

My opinion only: I'd suggest starting with a thin book over basic endings. Averbakh has one but there are many others.

Beyond that the issue is 1. study an ending and 2. you want that study to 'stick'.

For me what works is, after I play and ending to study endings of that sort so it connects to what I've just seen. For example, I am now studying rook+2p vs rook + 1p since I just misplayed one. before that 2R vs Q endings.

(Some people can take a comprehensive book, start on page 1 and work thru it then they know it. I cannot.)

Your approach to studying chess endings, focusing on specific scenarios you've recently encountered in your games, is both practical and relatable. It allows for a more personalized learning experience, connecting theory directly with your own gameplay experiences, such as your recent study of rook and pawn endings following a challenging match. This method, as opposed to the comprehensive cover-to-cover study, seems to be a more effective strategy for you in internalizing complex endgame concepts.

Lordpotato999

thx everybody great advice

I_AM_WINNER_SP

I don't have endgame books and there is no endgame books near me

pickledbrain123

Have found this riddle in an advent calendar escape room book. The clue is: WHEN THE KING FLEES FROM HIS DUNGEON, THE QUEEN FOLLOWS, AND THE RIDER CLOSES THE PROCESSION. I have tried: F4,F6,G4,E5 (the solution is 4 moves in this format) but it is incorrect. I’m a proper novice chess player so hoping someone can help?
bizonbiz
pickledbrain123 написал:
Have found this riddle in an advent calendar escape room book. The clue is: WHEN THE KING FLEES FROM HIS DUNGEON, THE QUEEN FOLLOWS, AND THE RIDER CLOSES THE PROCESSION. I have tried: F4,F6,G4,E5 (the solution is 4 moves in this format) but it is incorrect. I’m a proper novice chess player so hoping someone can help?

The riddle from your advent calendar escape room book seems to be a clever chess puzzle. The solution likely involves a sequence of four moves involving the king, queen, and a knight (rider). Since "F4, F6, G4, E5" didn't work, try a different combination that reflects the king moving first (fleeing the dungeon), followed by the queen, and then the knight (rider) making the final move. Consider the starting positions of these pieces and how they might move in a sequence.

Apa_de_izvor

I dunno :)

arunroghan

There was an endgame position that I should have won but lost. I was up a knight and initially two pawns and miscalculated and then it turned into a queen endgame and I was still winning when that happened but it turned into a more difficult win. I eventually drew because queen endgames are difficult because there are too many chances for checks.

I was playing black in the position.

SwimmerBill
arunroghan wrote:

There was an endgame position that I should have won but lost. I was up a knight and initially two pawns and miscalculated and then it turned into a queen endgame and I was still winning when that happened but it turned into a more difficult win. I eventually drew because queen endgames are difficult because there are too many chances for checks.

I was playing black in the position.

In your game near the end you had Q+K vs K + P about to queen on b2. That is a standard winning position:

you check moving the queen closer until you can check and your opponent has to move in front of the pawn. Then you get a free move and move your king 1 sq closer. Then repeat...

There are very many theoretical endgame positions and a few that practical club players need to know (this is one). They are covered in lots of books. I like Averbakh's Endings: Essential knowledge because it is thin and to the point. -Bill

ivanlosa

How interesting!

didiwe21

Warum 44. Kd5, einfach T f7 zugzwang und Schwarz hat eine figur mehr, oder?

itismeak

.o

RichColorado

If you get this book don't just read it actually setup the examples . . .

Because what you learn will be useful through your whole chess life . . .